Wayzata Public Schools

Interventions

We use a Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) as a framework for helping all students meet or exceed the State's challenging academic standards by providing a continuum of evidence-based instruction.

In our MTSS system, teachers provide high-quality first time instruction in classrooms. We regularly assess all students and analyze the data to determine which students need additional instruction. When we find that a student needs the support of additional instruction to make progress toward meeting the standards, we enroll them in an appropriate intervention in one of the following focus areas:

  • Literacy
  • Mathematics
  • Social Emotional Learning

We provide on-going progress monitoring so that we can match the level of intervention to the students' changing instructional needs.

Contact

Ann Fehrenbach
English Language Learners, Literacy, Title 1
Ann.Fehrenbach@wayzataschools.org

Literacy

We have a multi-tiered system of support for students, beginning with additional instruction by the classroom teacher and progressing to more focused instruction, both in increased time and in decreased student-to-instructor ratio. These multi-tiered interventions include:

  1. Additional classroom small group or individual instruction provided by the classroom teacher.
  2. Additional small group instruction provided by a Literacy Specialist or trained paraprofessional.
  3. Additional individual instruction provided by a Literacy Specialist.

Wayzata Public Schools also provides special education services for students with disabilities and English language services for students who have English as their second language. These services use specially designed instruction by a licensed special education or English language instructor.

Elementary

Program Details

Literacy Specialist Designed Intervention
Our intervention program is designed to meet the specific needs of our students. Literacy Specialists choose from a number of researched-based instructional strategies to tailor the learning to enhance students’ performance in reading. Strategies may include Reciprocal Teaching, Orton-Gillingham techniques, using Elkonin Boxes, Repeated Oral Reading, Words Their Way sorts, among others.

Reading Recovery
Reading Recovery is a short-term (12-20 weeks), one-to-one tutoring intervention for First Graders who are performing significantly below their peers. Reading Recovery teachers receive special training to deliver this proven, research-based program.

Key Support Personnel

Literacy specialists are licensed teachers who arrange and deliver interventions, assess and teach students. They may also serve as a resource assisting others who work with students. They may gather data, meet with grade level teams, do additional assessment for targeted instruction, work with paraprofessionals, set up safety nets (e.g. literacy volunteers) and follow up with records on new students.

Instructional paraprofessionals are educational support staff who meet Minnesota’s high standard requirements. Paraprofessionals provide supplemental practice to students who need assistance after an intervention by a licensed teacher, or with students who need extra practice to maintain their skills. Under the direction of a licensed teacher, they may assess and monitor a student’s progress and provide practice activities for students who need to hone their skills.

Assessment

In aligning assessment and data analysis to research, we seek to understand the purpose of and implement sound use of our various assessment tools. We use multiple data points to select students for intervention, monitor student progress with well-designed assessments and make available assessment information for individual teachers, families, Professional Learning Communities and Problem Solving Teams so that students receive appropriate instruction.

Universal Screening
Universal screening assessments are given to all students to help identify those students who are not progressing adequately and need extra help. The table below details the measures used to determine (along with classroom data and teacher input) the need for reading intervention in grades K-5 in the fall of the year. More detailed information about reading assessments in Grade K-3 can be found in Wayzata Public Schools’ Literacy Plan for Grades K-3.

Progress monitoring
The progress of students receiving reading intervention is monitored regularly. Teachers monitor students’ performance in lessons every day in order to provide feedback to students and adjust instruction. In addition, formal progress monitoring occurs every two weeks or more. Progress monitoring tools include Running Records and Fastbridge’s Reading Curriculum Based Measures and Early Reading Measures.

Wayzata Public Schools' Literacy Plan Grades K-3

Middle School

Program Details

Read 180
READ 180 addresses gaps in students’ literacy skills through the use of a computer program, literature and direct instruction in reading skills. The software component of the program aims to track and adapt to each student’s progress. In addition to the computer program, the READ 180 program includes workbooks designed to address reading comprehension skills, paperback books for independent reading and audiobooks with corresponding CDs for modeled reading.

Direct Instruction
East and Central middle schools offer additional Reading Intervention programming through direct instruction courses. Depending on student need, these courses may support content area reading or language arts coursework and/or provide additional instruction in reading strategies, comprehension, vocabulary, fluency and decoding.

Key Support Personnel

Literacy specialists are licensed teachers who arrange and deliver interventions, assess and teach students. They may also serve as a resource assisting others who work with students. They may gather data, meet with grade level teams, do additional assessment for targeted instruction, work with paraprofessionals, and follow up with records on new students.

Instructional paraprofessionals are educational support staff who meet Minnesota’s high standard requirements. Paraprofessionals provide additional support in intervention classes. Under the direction of a licensed teacher, they may assess and monitor a student’s progress and provide practice activities for students who need to hone their skills.

Assessment

In aligning assessment and data analysis to research, we seek to understand the purpose of and implement sound use of our various assessment tools. We use multiple data points to select students for intervention, monitor student progress with well designed assessments, including those embedded in Read 180. We make available assessment information for individual teachers, families, Professional Learning Communities and Problem Solving Teams so that students receive appropriate instruction.

High School

Program Details

Read 180
READ 180 addresses gaps in students’ literacy skills through the use of a computer program, literature and direct instruction in reading skills. The software component of the program aims to track and adapt to each student’s progress. In addition to the computer program, the READ 180 program includes workbooks designed to address reading comprehension skills, paperback books for independent reading and audiobooks with corresponding CDs for modeled reading.

Literacy Lab
Literacy Lab is an extension of the language arts curriculum. It is designed with specific targeted instruction in literacy skills, critical thinking and vocabulary. The smaller class environment is also to help to accommodate students’ individual learning strengths and growth areas. The course is designed to strengthen and support students’ literacy skills to better prepare them for success in the core courses at the high school.

Academic Resource Center
The Academic Resource Center is staffed by licensed teachers. The space provides tutoring and academic coaching (note-taking, organization) to students during the school day. Students access the ARC through their classroom teachers.

Key Support Personnel

Reading Teacher
The reading teacher is a licensed teacher who arranges and delivers interventions, assesses and teaches students. The teacher may also serve as a resource assisting others who work with students. The teacher may gather data, meet with grade level teams, and do additional assessment for targeted instruction.

Literacy Coach
The literacy coach is a licensed literacy specialist who serves as a resource assisting others who work with students. They may gather data, meet with grade level teams, do additional assessment, work with teachers and paraprofessionals.

Assessment

In aligning assessment and data analysis to research, we seek to understand the purpose of and implement sound use of our various assessment tools. We use multiple data points to select students for intervention, monitor student progress with well designed assessments, including those embedded in Read 180. We make available assessment information for individual teachers, families, Professional Learning Communities and Problem Solving Teams so that students receive appropriate instruction.

Mathematics

We have a multi-tiered system of support for students, beginning with additional instruction by the classroom teacher and progressing to more focused instruction, both in increased time and in decreased student-to-instructor ratio. These multi-tiered interventions include:

  1. Additional classroom small group or individual instruction provided by the classroom teacher.
  2. Additional small group instruction provided by a math interventionist or trained paraprofessional.
  3. Additional individual instruction provided by a math interventionist.

We also provide special education services for students with disabilities and English language services for students who have English as their second language. These services use specially designed instruction by a licensed special education or English language instructor.

Social Emotional Learning

We have a multi-tiered system of support for students regarding Social and Emotional supports. Supports begin within classrooms through curriculum, instruction and experiences and progresses to more focused instruction, both in increased time and in decreased student-to-instructor ratios. These multi-tiered interventions include:

  • Additional classroom small group or individual instruction provided by the classroom teacher.
  • Additional small group instruction provided by the school social worker, counselor, behavior specialist, achievement specialists, dean or other trained support personnel.
  • Additional individual instruction provided by social worker, Relate Counseling therapist (with parent permission), counselor, behavior specialist, achievement specialist, dean or other trained support personnel.

We also provide special education services for students with disabilities and English language services for students who have English as their second language. These services use specifically designed instruction by a licensed special education or English language instructor.

Family Engagement

Parents and caregivers play an integral part in their children’s success. We invite and encourage parent involvement. Assessment results are communicated regularly through conferences and conversations between teachers and families. Parents or guardians of students identified for intervention help outside of the classroom will receive notification prior to the intervention. All parents and guardians are encouraged to contact the school at any time with concerns or questions.

Surveys
We conduct an annual survey of parents whose students receive in intervention services.

Committees
Parents serve as members of advisory groups (ADSIS/Title I) to provide input and feedback regarding intervention services. Members must have a student receiving an intervention service. If interested in serving in an advisory role, please complete an application.

Dyslexia

We are committed to providing high quality instruction for all students, including those who have been diagnosed with dyslexia. Dyslexia is a neurologically-based disorder which interferes with acquiring and processing language. The degree to which dyslexia impacts learning varies from student to student. While some aspects of learning can present challenges, students' cognitive or intellectual abilities are not impacted by dyslexia. Sometimes students who have dyslexia may also have other learning disabilities like dysgraphia, a writing disability, or dyscalculia, a mathematical disability.

The documents and links found here are intended to provide a resource for families and staff working together to create rich learning opportunities for students with dyslexia.

My Child Has Dyslexia. Here’s what I want you to know

Minnesota Department of EducationFrequently Asked Questions Regarding Dyslexia