Wayzata Public Schools

Curriculum & Instruction

Our vision is to ensure each and every one of our students receives an excellent education so they can thrive today and excel tomorrow in an ever-changing global society. Our established curriculum review process and cycle fosters a continuous improvement model and involves community members who serve on our advisory committee.

Contact

Curriculum and Instruction Department
Education Services Center
12925 16th Avenue North
Plymouth, MN 55441

Curriculum, Instruction & Technology Advisory Committee

Shelly Nelson
Director of Curriculum and Instruction
763-745-6131
Shelly.Nelson@wayzataschools.org

Elementary Curriculum Overview

The elementary school experience provides a foundation for learning for all students. From the beginning of kindergarten, students learn the wide variety of skills necessary for success in school and out of school. There is a focus on foundational skills in reading, math, science and social studies. We recognize the importance of the arts, fitness and health, Spanish and technology on our students' ability to think creatively, globally and in a healthy manner. The integration of technology assists in the personalization of education, creating more interactive lessons, and building skills that are becoming increasingly important for success, such as digital literacy, communication and collaboration. Our staff works with all students to help them excel. To accomplish this, they use ongoing formative assessments and work in Professional Learning Teams to analyze student data to address individual needs.

Kindergarten

Throughout kindergarten, our students are challenged to develop academically, socially and emotionally. The introductory skills necessary to read, write and problem-solve are emphasized. Students are provided individualized support as they progress, at varying rates, through several reading and writing stages. Technology is integrated into the classroom to enhance learning experiences for students. Social and emotional skills are developed through structured play and self-directed activities.

English Language Arts

Children come to school with energy, excitement, curiosity, but, also, with different literacy experiences. We provide instruction to meet the needs of all our learners -- from those students who are already reading to those students who don't know how to write their name. At a minimum by the end of kindergarten, we expect our students to know their letters and sounds and to identify rhyming words. We expect students to know the concepts of print, e.g. what a word is, how to point to words as they are being read and that letters make up words. Students will learn some high-frequency words and how to spell using sounds. They begin to read some simple patterned books using the patterns and the pictures to help them and they write their own stories. By the end of kindergarten, we expect students to be able to retell a story that has been read to them and respond to questions about a story’s content. Most of all, we want to send our kindergartners off eager and excited to read and write!

Social Studies

In kindergarten, students are introduced to the four social studies disciplines of citizenship and government, economics, geography and history. They learn the importance of rules and demonstrate basic skills that reflect civic values. Students begin to identify things that define America’s civic identity, while also learning how cultures differ from one another. They use simple geographical tools and historical stories to explore various places and times. Students also develop an understanding of basic economic concepts related to scarcity—a key concept in the decision making process.

Health

Wayzata Public Schools has a comprehensive health education program to support the development of health literacy.

Each grade level addresses specific topics aligned to five units.

  • Mental, Emotional, Family & Social Health
  • Growth & Nutrition
  • Personal Health & Safety
  • Drugs and Disease Prevention
  • Community & Environmental Health

The primary resources used to address these topics in the classroom are McGraw Hill's Health & Wellness curriculum and the Second Step Program published by the Committee for Children.

Mathematics

Based on the belief that all students can learn, the experience of mathematics in Wayzata will create flexible problem solvers and critical thinkers.

We believe...

  • All students can learn.
  • Math is about thinking and reasoning, not just getting the answer.
  • Meaning and context is essential for learning mathematics.
  • Students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge.
  • It is critical for students to communicate their mathematical thinking.
  • All students can learn mathematics and contribute to the math environment.
  • All students will have access and contribute to high level mathematic discussions.
  • In teaching students to be persistent, flexible and creative problem solvers.
  • Students deserve to get feedback about their learning and progress towards mastery.
  • Students deserve a safe learning environment.

Bridges

Your child's classroom will use Bridges in Mathematics second edition, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5. Bridges is a rigorous program designed to address math standards in a way that's enjoyable and accessible to all learners.

How will my child learn math this year?

Our curriculum focuses on developing in students a deep understanding of math concepts, proficiency with key skills and the ability to solve new and complex problems. Learning activities tap into the intelligence and strengths all students have by presenting mathematically powerful material alive with language, pictures and movement.
During math time, students will talk about math, describe observations, explain methods and ask questions. They are encouraged to find multiple ways to solve problems and show different ways of thinking. This is a vital way to help students build more flexible and efficient ways to solve increasingly complex problems. Hands-on activities engage them in exploring, developing, testing, discussing and applying mathematical concepts.

How is the program structured?

Bridges features a combination of whole-group, small-group and independent activities that are problem centered.
Problems and Investigations
Problems and Investigations often begin with a problem posed to the whole class. Students think and work independently or talk in pairs before sharing and comparing strategies and solutions as a whole class. The teacher monitors and guides the class discussion to make sure that students understand important mathematical concepts.
Work Places
Work Places are engaging math exploration activities that reinforce key skills. The teacher observes and interacts to address students' need for support and enrichment.
Number Corner
Number Corner is a skill-building program that revolves around the classroom calendar and give students an active role. They receive daily practice as well as steady encounters with broader mathematical concepts.
Homework
Home Connections assignments are sent home at the discretion of your child's teacher. At times, your child may bring home math games or activities for you to enjoy together, but the main role for parents is not to teach but to guide your student and take an interest in their work. You'll be receiving Unit Overviews throughout the year that explain the math concepts the class is currently focused on and suggest specific ways you may support your child.

How can families help?

Make connections to their math understanding and the world around them.
Be curious! What do you notice? What do you wonder?
Capture moments to talk/think about something mathematically.
Make predictions.
Helping with homework?
Visit the support for families page on the Math Learning Center website, where you will find:
  • Unit overviews that explain what your child will be learning
  • Tips for helping your child with homework
  • Links to more information about each grade level of Bridges
  • Links to additional resources, including books and free online games

Media

Kindergarten students learn to differentiate between reality and make-believe and they learn about the parts of a book, including title, author and illustrator. Children also learn about choices for resources and how to locate and use information and resources.

Science

Young children are curious about the world around them. The kindergarten science curriculum fosters and encourages that curiosity. Students will engage in hands-on science learning activities using the research-based Foss science curriculum, developed at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkeley. Students will interact with at least two Foss modules.

Trees
In the Trees unit, the systematic investigation of trees will bring students to a better understanding of trees' place at school and in the community, and will provide some solid experiences on the way to understanding all plants.

Fabrics
In the Fabric unit, students are introduced to a wide variety of fabrics, so that they become familiar with fabrics' properties, discover what happens when they are tested and discover how they interact with other materials, including water. These two Foss modules fully support the Minnesota state science standards.

Teachers may also opt to teach two additional science units. The first optional unit, Animals Two by Two, requires students observe and care for animals over time and observe differences in structure and behavior. The second optional unit, Wood and Paper, asks students to observe the properties of these materials and discover what happens when they are subjected to a number of tests and interactions with other materials. Students learn that wood and paper can be recycled to create new forms of paper or wood that have new properties. The concept of trees as natural resources is introduced.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Grade 1

Throughout first grade, our students are challenged to develop academically, socially and emotionally. The core skills necessary to read, write and problem-solve are emphasized. Students are provided individualized support as they progress, at varying rates, through several reading and writing stages. Technology is integrated into the classroom to enhance learning experiences for students. Core skills are further enhanced as students make observations and investigate science and social studies topics. Students are provided art, music and physical education experiences.

Art

Art Education Mission Statement

The Art Curriculum is designed to give art teachers freedom to deliver the curriculum in a personalized manner, while ensuring all elementary students throughout the district learn the same information. There are six Units, or Learning Target Packages, all students will experience in 1st Grade, which include the following:

  • Cave Art: Students will earn about petroglyphs and pictographs of Minnesota and how to ‘read’ the symbols in cave art drawings using key. Students will create an artwork using cave art symbols to tell a story.
  • Native American Artist Julie Buffalohead: Julie Buffalohead is a Native American artist, who creates artworks with personified animals. Students will use Ojibwe animal symbolism to ‘read’ the stories and draw their own animal stories using Ojibwe symbolism.
  • Piet Mondrian: Students will learn about Piet Mondrian and the artwork he made. They will then create their own artwork inspired by Mondrian, using vertical and horizontal lines.
  • Colors: Students will learn to find and use Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, BIue, Violet and mix the secondary colors. They will also explore mixing tints and shades.
  • Textures: 1st Graders will explore textures by finding, naming and creating textures. They will also learn about the difference between textures they can see and feel.
  • Observational Drawing: Students will practice observation drawing by drawing what they see with an outline.

Additionally students in all grade levels will create art on a computer or iPad and will also create a 3-Dimensional artwork.

Process & Product
The Art Curriculum works to balance the process of creating with the final product, by focusing on the Create Process Map created by The Perpich Center for the Arts.

Visual Literacy

Visual Literacy, or the ability to ‘read’ an artwork, begins in first grade and is used in all levels of the Wayzata Art Curriculum. Visual Literacy includes Visual Analysis and Critique and focuses on students making their own meaning by noticing, making connections, connecting feelings, analyzing, questioning, interpreting and speculating.

English Language Arts

Children begin first grade with a variety of literacy skills. It is our intent to provide instruction to meet the needs of all our learners—from those students who are already reading and understanding chapter books to those students who have not yet begun reading books. By the end of the year students should be able to read books. Their accuracy and fluency should indicate that they recognize most words, can use the meaning of the story and the letters to help them solve words and have strategies to fix up the reading when it is not making sense. They should read independently and retell a story or respond to questions about a story's content. Their writing should reflect an increasing knowledge of sight words and spelling patterns. They should use writing to communicate - from stories to reports to friendly letters.

Mathematics

Based on the belief that all students can learn, the experience of mathematics in Wayzata will create flexible problem solvers and critical thinkers.

We believe...

  • All students can learn.
  • Math is about thinking and reasoning, not just getting the answer.
  • Meaning and context is essential for learning mathematics.
  • Students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge.
  • It is critical for students to communicate their mathematical thinking.
  • All students can learn mathematics and contribute to the math environment.
  • All students will have access and contribute to high level mathematic discussions.
  • In teaching students to be persistent, flexible and creative problem solvers.
  • Students deserve to get feedback about their learning and progress towards mastery.
  • Students deserve a safe learning environment.

Bridges

Your child's classroom will use Bridges in Mathematics second edition, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5. Bridges is a rigorous program designed to address math standards in a way that's enjoyable and accessible to all learners.

How will my child learn math this year?

Our curriculum focuses on developing in students a deep understanding of math concepts, proficiency with key skills and the ability to solve new and complex problems. Learning activities tap into the intelligence and strengths all students have by presenting mathematically powerful material alive with language, pictures and movement.
During math time, students will talk about math, describe observations, explain methods and ask questions. They are encouraged to find multiple ways to solve problems and show different ways of thinking. This is a vital way to help students build more flexible and efficient ways to solve increasingly complex problems. Hands-on activities engage them in exploring, developing, testing, discussing and applying mathematical concepts.

How is the program structured?

Bridges features a combination of whole-group, small-group, and independent activities that are problem centered.
Problems and Investigations
Problems and Investigations often begin with a problem posed to the whole class. Students think and work independently or talk in pairs before sharing and comparing strategies and solutions as a whole class. The teacher monitors and guides the class discussion to make sure that students understand important mathematical concepts.
Work Places
Work Places are engaging math exploration activities that reinforce key skills. The teacher observes and interact to address students' need for support and enrichment.
Number Corner
Number Corner is a skill-building program that revolves around the classroom calendar and give students an active role. They receive daily practice as well as steady encounters with broader mathematical concepts.
Homework
Home Connections assignments are sent home at the discretion of your child's teacher. At times, your child may bring home math games or activities for you to enjoy together, but the main role for parents is not to teach but to guide your student and take an interest in their work. You'll be receiving Unit Overviews throughout the year that explain the math concepts the class is currently focused on and suggest specific ways you may support your child.

How can families help?

Make connections to their math understanding and the world around them.
Be curious! What do you notice? What do you wonder?
Capture moments to talk/think about something mathematically.
Make predictions.
Helping with homework?
Visit the support for families page on the Math Learning Center website, where you will find:
  • Unit overviews that explain what your child will be learning
  • Tips for helping your child with homework
  • Links to more information about each grade level of Bridges
  • Links to additional resources, including books and free online games

Media

Students will learn about a variety of authors and develop an understanding of what makes literature great. Students also develop information literacy skills and skills that enhance the inquiry process. Students learn to locate and use both print and digital information and resources, identify the topic of resources and formulate questions about a topic.

Music

Students will be taking part in a variety of activities in 1st grade music class where they will be developing their attitudes and feelings about music. These activities are an introduction to help your child develop the following music skills: sing, move, create, read, perform, listen and describe music.

Singing activities are the primary focus of instruction and include songs from our American folk music tradition, as well as songs from many other cultures. Both individual and group participation contribute to students’ development as music makers. Your child will also listen to music written in many styles and from many different periods of history. Other activities in music class include learning to play percussion instruments, studying music history, performing rhythmic exercises, responding to music through movement and reading music notation.

The elementary music department is dedicated to the development and maintenance of a positive classroom environment and to providing a thorough music education program that is relevant to the needs and interests of each child. Our goal is to help students acquire the knowledge and skills that will enable them to explore, appreciate and participate in the rich musical culture outside of the classroom throughout their lives.

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility and enjoyment of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a lifetime. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety and fitness.
  • Improved judgment - Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Health

Wayzata Public Schools has a comprehensive health education program to support the development of health literacy.

Each grade level addresses specific topics aligned to five units.

  • Mental, Emotional, Family & Social Health
  • Growth & Nutrition
  • Personal Health & Safety
  • Drugs and Disease Prevention
  • Community & Environmental Health

The primary resources used to address these topics in the classroom are McGraw Hill's Health & Wellness curriculum and the Second Step Program published by the Committee for Children.

Science

The first grade science curriculum will continue to foster curiosity. Students will engage in hands-on science learning activities using the research-based Foss science curriculum, developed at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkley. Students will interact with at least two Foss modules.

New Plants
The New Plants module provides experiences that heighten young students’ awareness of the diversity of life in the plant kingdom. Students care for plants to learn what they need to grow and develop. They observe the structures of flowering plants and discover ways to propagate new plants from mature plants(from seeds, bulbs, roots, and stem cuttings). They observe and describe changes that occur as plants grow and organize their observations on a calendar and in a journal.

Pebbles, Sand and Silt
The Pebbles, Sand and Silt module consists of four sequential investigations, each designed to introduce concepts in earth science. The investigations provide experiences that heighten students’ awareness of rocks as earth materials and natural resources. They will come to know rocks by many names and in a variety of sizes. Pebbles and sand are the same material—just different in size.

Teachers may also opt to teach two additional Foss modules. The Air and Weather introduces concepts in earth science. The investigations provide opportunities for young students to explore the natural world by using simple tools to observe and monitor change. The Magnetism module is designed to introduce concepts in physical science. The investigations provide opportunities for students to explore the natural and human-made worlds by observing and manipulating materials in focused settings using simple tools.

Social Studies

Students in grade one learn basic concepts and skills related to the four social studies disciplines of citizenship and government, economics, geography and history. They expand their understanding of America’s civic identity, determine characteristics of effective rules and demonstrate ways for citizens to participate in civic life. Their exploration of the federal government begins with the elected office of president. Fundamental geography skills are introduced including making sketch maps of places and comparing their physical and human characteristics and identifying locations. Students practice basic historical inquiry skills by asking questions, constructing a timeline and examining simple records and artifacts. They build their knowledge of the past by comparing family life, buildings and other technologies from earlier times to today. Students acquire a basic understanding of the economic concepts of scarcity and trade and weigh the costs and benefits of simple alternative choices.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that our students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Grade 2

Throughout second grade, our students are challenged to develop academically, socially and emotionally. Students continue to develop reading and writing skills with an emphasis on increasing fluency and comprehension. Mathematical reasoning and problem-solving skills are developed through a variety of classroom experiences. Technology is integrated into the classroom to enhance learning experiences for students. Students begin to use the scientific method to make observations in science. The classroom community is used to teach the importance of citizenship. Art, music and physical education experiences are provided.

Art

Wayzata Art Education Mission Statement

The Art Curriculum is designed to give art teachers freedom to deliver the curriculum in a personalized manner, while ensuring all elementary students throughout the district learn the same information. There are 5 Units, or Learning Target Packages, all students will experience in 2nd Grade, which include the following:

  • African Art: Students will learn about the history of African Art, and look for repetition, exaggeration, and symmetry in African artworks. They will then use these three vocabulary works while creating their own artwork inspired by African Art.
  • Native American Artist Jim Denomie: 2nd graders will be examining the animal artworks created by Jim Denomie, while connecting the artworks to Minnesota Native American animal symbolism. Students will create their own Denomie inspired animal using shapes and will use blended colors.
  • Pablo Picasso: Students will learn about Picasso’s artwork and its impact on the world of art and will also connect his artwork to African Art. Students will create a Cubist artwork inspired by Picasso.
  • Mixed Media: Students will create an artwork with mixed media with a color scheme, symmetry and texture.
  • Composition: 2nd Graders will learn about the important of composition in creating a balanced artwork. They will show balance in artworks by finding shapes and colors, asymmetry and symmetry and will use overlap.

Additionally students in all grade levels will create art on a computer or iPad and will also create a 3-Dimensional artwork.

Process & Product
The Art Curriculum works to balance the process of creating with the final product, by focusing on the Create Process Map created by The Perpich Center for the Arts.

Art: Imagine, Plan, Explore, Make, Refine, Present, Reflect around creation

Visual Literacy
Visual Literacy, or the ability to ‘read’ an artwork, begins in first grade and is used in all levels of the Wayzata Art Curriculum. Visual Literacy includes Visual Analysis and Critique and focuses on student’s making their own meaning by noticing, making connections, connecting feelings, analyzing, questioning, interpreting and speculating.

English Language Arts

Second graders make a transition from "learning to read" to "reading to learn." Reading and writing become tools to get and communicate information. By the end of the year, most second graders understand and enjoy books that are considerably longer and more complex than first grade books. They have made the transition to "chapter books." While reading silently, they are able to make predictions and inferences, to summarize, or ask themselves questions. They read for both fun and information. Second graders write with an audience and purpose in mind. The organization of their written pieces reflects the genre they are writing, e.g. stories have a plot with a beginning, middle and end; poems have lines and stanzas.

Health

Wayzata Public Schools has a comprehensive health education program to support the development of health literacy.

Each grade level addresses specific topics aligned to five units.

  • Mental, Emotional, Family & Social Health
  • Growth & Nutrition
  • Personal Health & Safety
  • Drugs and Disease Prevention
  • Community & Environmental Health

The primary resources used to address these topics in the classroom are McGraw Hill's Health & Wellness curriculum and the Second Step Program published by the Committee for Children.

Mathematics

Based on the belief that all students can learn, the experience of mathematics in Wayzata will create flexible problem solvers and critical thinkers.

We believe...

  • All students can learn.
  • Math is about thinking and reasoning, not just getting the answer.
  • Meaning and context is essential for learning mathematics.
  • Students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge.
  • It is critical for student to communicate their mathematical thinking.
  • All students can learn mathematics and contribute to the math environment.
  • All students will have access and contribute to high level mathematic discussions.
  • In teaching students to be persistent, flexible and creative problem solvers.
  • Students deserve to get feedback about their learning and progress towards mastery.
  • Students deserve a safe learning environment.

Bridges

Your child's classroom will use Bridges in Mathematics second edition, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5. Bridges is a rigorous program designed to address math standards in a way that's enjoyable and accessible to all learners.

How will my child learn math this year?

Our curriculum focuses on developing in students a deep understanding of math concepts, proficiency with key skills and the ability to solve new and complex problems. Learning activities tap into the intelligence and strengths all students have by presenting mathematically powerful material alive with language, pictures and movement.
During math time, students will talk about math, describe observations, explain methods and ask questions. They are encouraged to find multiple ways to solve problems and show different ways of thinking. This is a vital way to help students build more flexible and efficient ways to solve increasingly complex problems. Hands-on activities engage them in exploring, developing, testing, discussing and applying mathematical concepts.

How is the program structured?

Bridges features a combination of whole-group, small-group and independent activities that are problem centered.
Problems and Investigations
Problems and Investigations often begin with a problem posed to the whole class. Students think and work independently or talk in pairs before sharing and comparing strategies and solutions as a whole class. The teacher monitors and guides the class discussion to make sure that students understand important mathematical concepts.
Work Places
Work Places are engaging math exploration activities that reinforce key skills. The teacher observes and interacts to address students' need for support and enrichment.
Number Corner
Number Corner is a skill-building program that revolves around the classroom calendar and give students an active role. They receive daily practice as well as steady encounters with broader mathematical concepts.
Homework
Home Connections assignments are sent home at the discretion of your child's teacher. At times, your child may bring home math games or activities for you to enjoy together, but the main role for parents is not to teach but to guide your student and take an interest in their work. You'll be receiving Unit Overviews throughout the year that explain the math concepts the class is currently focused on and suggest specific ways you may support your child.

How can families help?

Make connections to their math understanding and the world around them.
Be curious! What do you notice? What do you wonder?
Capture moments to talk/think about something mathematically.
Make predictions.
Helping with homework?
Visit the support for families page on the Math Learning Center website, where you will find:
  • Unit overviews that explain what your child will be learning
  • Tips for helping your child with homework
  • Links to more information about each grade level of Bridges
  • Links to additional resources, including books and free online games

Media

Students continue to learn about their choices in reading, viewing and listening and further their understanding of what makes literature great. Students will focus on various styles of illustrations and learn how they enhance text through the study of Caldecott Award winning books.

Students will continue to develop information literacy skills and skills that enhance the inquiry process. Students will compare and contrast print and online resources and learn to locate and use information and resources. Students will be introduced to the concept of copyright and plagiarism for print and non-print electronic resources.

Music

Students will be taking part in a variety of activities in 2nd grade music class where they will be developing their attitudes and feelings about music. These ongoing activities will help your child develop the following music skills: sing, move, create, read, perform, listen and describe music.

Singing activities are the primary focus of instruction and include songs from our American folk music tradition, as well as songs from many other cultures. Both individual and group participation contribute to students’ development as music makers. Your child will also listen to music written in many styles and from many different periods of history. Other activities in music class include learning to play percussion instruments, studying music history, performing rhythmic exercises, responding to music through movement and reading music notation.

The elementary music department is dedicated to the development and maintenance of a positive classroom environment and to providing a thorough music education program that is relevant to the needs and interests of each child. Our goal is to help students acquire the knowledge and skills that will enable them to explore, appreciate and participate in the rich musical culture outside of the classroom throughout their lives.

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from Kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility and enjoyment of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a lifetime. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety and fitness.
  • Improved judgment - Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Science

The second grade science curriculum will continue to foster curiosity and inquiry. Students will engage in hands-on science learning activities using the research-based Foss science curriculum, developed at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkley. Students will interact with at least three Foss modules.

Balance and Motion
We live in a dynamic world where everything is in motion, or so it seems. But not everything is moving the same way. Some things move from one place to another. Other things go around and around in a rotational motion. Still other things are stationary, stable for a time, balanced on a thin line between stop and go. These are the global phenomena that students experience, explore and investigate in this module, Balance and Motion.

Solids and Liquids
The Solids and Liquids module provides experiences that heighten students’ awareness of the physical world. Matter with which we interact exists in three fundamental states: solid, liquid and gas. In this module second graders have introductory experiences with two of these states of matter, solid and liquid.

Insects
The Insects module provides experiences that heighten students’ awareness of the diversity of animal forms. They come to know firsthand the life sequences of a number of insects. In each investigation an insect is introduced and students observe structures and behaviors, discuss their findings and ask questions. Students observe life cycles of insects and compare the stages of metamorphosis exhibited by each species.

Social Studies

Students in second grade continue to build their foundational understanding in the social studies disciplines of citizenship and government, economics, geography and history. They learn the purpose and services provided by government, the principle of shared and separated powers, the importance of constitutions and the need for fair voting processes. They study indigenous people and the influence of a variety of cultures on our society, gaining an understanding of the United States’ common heritage and diverse roots. They use calendars and timelines to track the passage of time and chronicle events. By describing the trade-offs of a decision, students learn the concept of opportunity cost and its connection to scarcity of resources. They begin to understand how resources and physical features influence the distribution of people around the world and use maps and other geographic tools to explain the characteristics of places.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Grade 3

Throughout third grade, our students continue to be challenged to develop academically, socially and emotionally. "Reading to learn" becomes a reality in third grade, as students become confident readers. Students hone their reading, writing and problem-solving skills through a variety of classroom experiences. Number sense, fact fluency and mathematical reasoning continue to be emphasized in the math classroom. Students develop map reading skills through a social studies curriculum which focuses on globes and physical, political and thematic maps. Through the completion of sequential science investigations, students are introduced to fundamental concepts in earth science and explore the natural and human-made worlds. Technology is integrated into the classroom to enhance learning experiences for students. Art, music and physical education experiences are provided.

Art

Wayzata Art Education Mission Statement

The Art Curriculum is designed to give art teachers freedom to deliver the curriculum in a personalized manner, while ensuring all elementary students throughout the district learn the same information. There are 4 Units, or Learning Target Packages, all students will experience in 3rd Grade, which include the following:

  • Ancient Civilizations: Students will be learning about art from three Ancient Civilizations including Egypt, China and Greece and will be learning about these civilizations in Social Studies as well. They will learn about cultural symbols and create art inspired by the civilizations.
  • Minnesota Native American Artwork: After exploring traditional Minnesota Native American designs students will create a 3-dimensional artwork that incorporates traditional designs.
  • Alma Thomas: Students will be learning about Alma Thomas and the artwork she creates, and then will create an artwork inspired by her. They will be choosing a color scheme with emotion, using nature as their inspiration and create a title for their artwork.
  • Elements Representation: After exploring the Elements of Art in 1st and 2nd grade, students will apply their knowledge by creating an artwork representing the seven Elements of Art: line, texture, color, value, shape, form and space.
Additionally students in all grade levels will create art on a computer or iPad and will also create a 3-Dimensional artwork.

Process & Product
The Art Curriculum works to balance the process of creating with the final product, by focusing on the Create Process Map created by The Perpich Center for the Arts.

Art: Imagine, Plan, Explore, Make, Refine, Present, Reflect around creation

Visual Literacy

Visual Literacy, or the ability to ‘read’ an artwork, begins in first grade and is used in all levels of the Wayzata Art Curriculum. Visual Literacy includes Visual Analysis and Critique and focuses on student’s making their own meaning by noticing, making connections, connecting feelings, analyzing, questioning, interpreting and speculating.

English Language Arts

Third graders should be confident readers and writers. They comprehend shades of meaning and reveal a deep understanding of text. “Reading to learn” becomes a reality in third grade. Students do independent research from sources. Nonfiction is as much a part of their reading as fiction. Third graders continue to hone their writing skills. Their writing shows more complexity; e.g. using dialogue, varying sentence beginnings and using paragraphs.

Health

Wayzata Public Schools has a comprehensive health education program to support the development of health literacy.

Each grade level addresses specific topics aligned to five units.

  • Mental, Emotional, Family & Social Health
  • Growth & Nutrition
  • Personal Health & Safety
  • Drugs and Disease Prevention
  • Community & Environmental Health

The primary resources used to address these topics in the classroom are McGraw Hill's Health & Wellness curriculum and the Second Step Program published by the Committee for Children.

Mathematics

Based on the belief that all students can learn, the experience of mathematics in Wayzata will create flexible problem solvers and critical thinkers.

We believe...

  • All students can learn.
  • Math is about thinking and reasoning, not just getting the answer.
  • Meaning and context is essential for learning mathematics.
  • Students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge.
  • It is critical for students to communicate their mathematical thinking.
  • All students can learn mathematics and contribute to the math environment.
  • All students will have access and contribute to high level mathematic discussions.
  • In teaching students to be persistent, flexible, and creative problem solvers.
  • Students deserve to get feedback about their learning and progress towards mastery.
  • Students deserve a safe learning environment.

Bridges

Your child's classroom will use Bridges in Mathematics second edition, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5. Bridges is a rigorous program designed to address math standards in a way that's enjoyable and accessible to all learners.

How will my child learn math this year?

Our curriculum focuses on developing in students a deep understanding of math concepts, proficiency with key skills and the ability to solve new and complex problems. Learning activities tap into the intelligence and strengths all students have by presenting mathematically powerful material alive with language, pictures and movement.
During math time, students will talk about math, describe observations, explain methods and ask questions. They are encouraged to find multiple ways to solve problems and show different ways of thinking. This is a vital way to help students build more flexible and efficient ways to solve increasingly complex problems. Hands-on activities engage them in exploring, developing, testing, discussing and applying mathematical concepts.

How is the program structured?

Bridges features a combination of whole-group, small-group and independent activities that are problem centered.
Problems and Investigations
Problems and Investigations often begin with a problem posed to the whole class. Students think and work independently or talk in pairs before sharing and comparing strategies and solutions as a whole class. The teacher monitors and guides the class discussion to make sure that students understand important mathematical concepts.
Work Places
Work Places are engaging math exploration activities that reinforce key skills. The teacher observes and interacts to address students' need for support and enrichment.
Number Corner
Number Corner is a skill-building program that revolves around the classroom calendar and give students an active role. They receive daily practice as well as steady encounters with broader mathematical concepts.
Homework
Home Connections assignments are sent home at the discretion of your child's teacher. At times, your child may bring home math games or activities for you to enjoy together, but the main role for parents is not to teach but to guide your student and take an interest in their work. You'll be receiving Unit Overviews throughout the year that explain the math concepts the class is currently focused on and suggest specific ways you may support your child.

How can families help?

Make connections to their math understanding and the world around them.
Be curious! What do you notice? What do you wonder?
Capture moments to talk/think about something mathematically.
Make predictions.
Helping with homework?
Visit the support for families page on the Math Learning Center website, where you will find:
  • Unit overviews that explain what your child will be learning
  • Tips for helping your child with homework
  • Links to more information about each grade level of Bridges
  • Links to additional resources, including books and free online games

Media

Students continue to learn about their choices in reading, viewing and listening and further their understanding of what makes literature great. Students will choose something to read for personal enjoyment and learn about the Maud Hart Lovelace Award.

Students will continue to develop information literacy skills and skills that enhance the inquiry process. Students will use an electronic catalog to search by subject or keyword, access print and non-print resources, learn ways to locate information within resources, locate specific materials in the Media Center and begin to understand the Dewey Decimal system. Students will brainstorm possible resources for a topic, locate and select a limited number of resources related to a topic, evaluate the selected resources and record bibliographic entries.

Music

Singing activities are the primary focus of instruction and include songs from our American folk music tradition, as well as songs from many other cultures. Both individual and group participation contribute to students’ development as music makers. Your child will also listen to music written in many styles and from many different periods of history. Other activities in music class include learning to play percussion instruments, studying music history, performing rhythmic exercises, responding to music through movement and reading music notation.

The elementary music department is dedicated to the development and maintenance of a positive classroom environment and to providing a thorough music education program that is relevant to the needs and interests of each child. Our goal is to help students acquire the knowledge and skills that will enable them to explore, appreciate and participate in the rich musical culture outside of the classroom throughout their lives.

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from Kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility and enjoyment of of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a lifetime. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety and fitness.
  • Improved judgment - Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Science

In third grade students will continue to experience science using the research-based FOSS science curriculum, developed at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkeley. Science content is reflective of the Minnesota State science standards and emphasize concepts in the areas of scientific investigation, sound and light waves, acquired and inherited plant and animal traits and their impact on growth, survival and reproduction, and our solar system. The FOSS modules used include Physics of Sound, Structures of Life and Sun, Moon and Stars.

Physics of Sound:
The Physics of Sound Unit consists of investigations designed to allow students to explore the concept of sound. Students learn how sound is made, how pitch and the rate of vibration are related and the variables used to manipulate the pitch of a sound.

Structures of Life:
The Structures of Life Unit consists of investigations that allow students to observe, compare, categorize, and care for a selection of organisms. Throughout the unit students learn to identify properties of plants and animals and to sort and group organisms on the basis of observable properties. Students also investigate structures of the organisms and learn how some of the structures function in growth and survival.

Sun, Moon and Stars:
The Sun, Moon and Stars unit consists of investigations that allow students to explore the shadows created by sun, the phases of moon, and constellations in the sky. Students will explore what causes seasons, day and night and why the stars (including the Sun), and the moon appear to move and change over time. Students will use Science Notebooking for this and all other modules to record their findings and understandings.

Social Studies

In grade three, students expand and deepen their knowledge in the four social studies disciplines of citizenship and government, economics, geography and history. By applying basic concepts in each discipline to complex communities and environments near and far, students begin to understand the social, economic, geographic and political aspects of life in the world beyond our state and nation. They create and interpret simple maps, using them to understand the physical and human characteristics of places around the world, from one’s neighborhood to vast regions of the earth. As students examine the world of long ago through historical records, maps and artifacts, they discover how geographic factors, technology and individual and group actions have shaped history. Students practice weighing the costs and benefits in making decisions and examine the economic forces that influence interactions among individuals in a community. They further explore the civic relationship between an individual and the community in the United States in which he or she lives, the three branches of government and the functions and funding of government.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Grade 4

Throughout fourth grade, our students are challenged to develop academically, socially and emotionally. Students learn to read and comprehend increasingly complex texts. Students mature as writers and produce work that is more complex in sentence structure and paragraph development. Computational fluency, number sense and problem solving skills are emphasized in math. Students continue to develop map reading skills through a social studies curriculum which focuses on globes and physical, political and thematic maps. Through completion of sequential science investigations, students explore the natural and human-made worlds by observing and manipulating materials in focused settings using simple tools.

In fourth grade, students begin to study Spanish, gaining a knowledge and understanding of other cultures. Students begin to develop skills to allow them to communicate in Spanish. A strong art, music and physical education program continue to be provided and technology is integrated into the classroom to enhance the learning experience for students.

Art

Wayzata Art Education Mission Statement

The Art Curriculum is designed to give art teachers freedom to deliver the curriculum in a personalized manner, while ensuring all elementary students throughout the district learn the same information. There are 3 Units, or Learning Target Packages, all students will experience in 4th Grade, which include the following:

  • Mexican Folk Art: Students will be learning about art from Mexico, and will be learning about Mexican culture and history in Social Studies as well. They will learn about cultural symbols and designs, and create art inspired by the Mexican Folk Art.
  • Minnesota Native American artist Frank Big Bear Self-Portraits: 4th graders will examine the art of Frank Big Bear and create a self-portrait inspired by his style of artwork. They will learn how to draw a self-portrait using correct proportions and observation drawing.
  • Landscapes: Students will learn about the 5 illusions of depth, compare and contrast traditional and urban or modern landscapes and analyze the elements and principles used in the artworks. Students will then create their own landscape.
Additionally students in all grade levels will create art on a computer or iPad and will also create a 3-Dimensional artwork.

Process & Product
The Art Curriculum works to balance the process of creating with the final product, by focusing on the Create Process Map created by The Perpich Center for the Arts.

Art: Imagine, Plan, Explore, Make, Refine, Present, Reflect around creation

Visual Literacy
Visual Literacy, or the ability to ‘read’ an artwork, begins in first grade and is used in all levels of the Wayzata Art Curriculum. Visual Literacy includes Visual Analysis and Critique, and focuses on student’s making their own meaning by noticing, making connections, connecting feelings, analyzing, questioning, interpreting and speculating.

English Language Arts

Fourth graders read increasingly complex texts. They comprehend shades of meaning and reveal a deep understanding of text. They read for extended periods of time and discuss what they have read from multiple genres. The pieces they write reflect more complex sentence structures, paragraphing, and a high level of correct punctuation and grammar. Fourth graders begin to choose words more deliberately when they write. They edit and proofread their writing.

Health

Wayzata Public Schools has a comprehensive health education program to support the development of health literacy.

Each grade level addresses specific topics aligned to five units.

  • Mental, Emotional, Family & Social Health
  • Growth & Nutrition
  • Personal Health & Safety
  • Drugs and Disease Prevention
  • Community & Environmental Health

The primary resources used to address these topics in the classroom are McGraw Hill's Health & Wellness curriculum and the Second Step Program published by the Committee for Children.

Mathematics

Based in the belief that all students can learn, the experience of mathematics in Wayzata will create flexible problem solvers and critical thinkers.

We believe...

  • All students can learn.
  • Math is about thinking and reasoning, not just getting the answer.
  • Meaning and context is essential for learning mathematics.
  • Students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge.
  • It is critical for student to communicate their mathematical thinking.
  • All students can learn mathematics and contribute to the math environment.
  • All students will have access and contribute to high level mathematic discussions.
  • In teaching students to be persistent, flexible, and creative problem solvers.
  • Students deserve to get feedback about their learning and progress towards mastery.
  • Students deserve a safe learning environment.

Bridges

Your child's classroom will use Bridges in Mathematics second edition, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5. Bridges is a rigorous program designed to address math standards in a way that's enjoyable and accessible to all learners.

How will my child learn math this year?

Our curriculum focuses on developing in students a deep understanding of math concepts, proficiency with key skills, and the ability to solve new and complex problems. Learning activities tap into the intelligence and strengths all student have by presenting mathematically powerful material alive with language, pictures, and movement.
During math time, students will talk about math, describe observations, explain methods, and ask questions. They are encouraged to find multiple ways to solve problems and show different ways of thinking. This is a vital way to help students build more flexible and efficient ways to solve increasingly complex problems. Hands-on activities engage them in exploring, developing, testing, discussing, and applying mathematical concepts.

How is the program structured?

Bridges features a combination of whole-group, small-group, and independent activities that are problem centered.
Problems and Investigations
Problems and Investigations often begin with a problem posed to the whole class. Students think and work independently or talk in pairs before sharing and comparing strategies and solutions as a whole class. The teacher monitors and guides the class discussion to make sure that students understand important mathematical concepts.
Work Places
Work Places are engaging math exploration activities that reinforce key skills. The teacher observes and interact to address students' need for support and enrichment.
Number Corner
Number Corner is a skill-building program that revolves around the classroom calendar and give students an active role. They receive daily practice as well as steady encounters with broader mathematical concepts.
Homework
Home Connections assignments are sent home at the discretion of your child's teacher. At times, your child may bring home math games or activities for you to enjoy together, but the main role for parents is not to teach but to guide your student and take an interest in their work. You'll be receiving Unit Overviews throughout the year that explain the math concepts the class is currently focused on and suggest specific ways you may support your child.

How can families help?

Make connections to their math understanding and the world around them.
Be curious! What do you notice? What do you wonder?
Capture moments to talk/think about something mathematically.
Make predictions.
Helping with homework?
Visit the support for families page on the Math Learning Center website, where you will find:
  • Unit overviews that explain what your child will be learning
  • Tips for helping your child with homework
  • Links to more information about each grade level of Bridges
  • Links to additional resources, including books and free online games

Media

Students continue to learn about their choices in reading, viewing and listening, and further their understanding of what makes literature great. Students will learn the purpose and criteria of book awards such as the Maud Hart Lovelace and Newbery Awards. Students will use the online catalog to find materials and manage their own accounts.

Students will continue to develop information literacy skills and skills that enhance the inquiry process. Students will use organizational tools in print and digital resources as they explore and evaluate these resources.

Music

Students will be taking part in a variety of activities in 4th grade music class where they will be developing their attitudes and feelings about music. These ongoing experiences will continue your child's development of the following music skills: sing, move, create, read, perform, listen, and describe music.

Singing activities are the primary focus of instruction, and include songs from our American folk music tradition, as well as songs from many other cultures. Both individual and group participation contribute to students’ development as music makers. Your child will also listen to music written in many styles and from many different periods of history. Other activities in music class include learning to play percussion instruments, studying music history, performing rhythmic exercises, responding to music through movement, and reading music notation. Special emphasis will be placed on recorder performance.

The elementary music department is dedicated to the development and maintenance of a positive classroom environment and to providing a thorough music education program that is relevant to the needs and interests of each child. Our goal is to help students acquire the knowledge and skills that will enable them to explore, appreciate, and participate in the rich musical culture outside of the classroom throughout their lives.

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from Kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility, and enjoyment of of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a life-time. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance, and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math, and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety, and fitness.
  • Improved judgment -Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others, and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games, and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Science

In Fourth grade students will continue to experience science using the research-based Foss science curriculum, developed at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkeley. Science content is reflective of the Minnesota State science standards and emphasizes concepts in the areas of engineering design, rocks and minerals, magnetism and electricity, matter, energy, and the water cycle. Foss units that will be taught include Earth Materials, Matter and Energy, Magnetism and Electricity and Water.

Magnetism and Electricity
The Magnetism and Electricity Unit consists of investigations designed to introduce concepts in magnetism, circuits, conductors and insulators and electromagnets.

Matter and Energy
The Matter and Energy Unit consists of investigations in which students experience a variety of forms of matter and energy. They investigate the properties of light, observe the conversion of energy from one form to another and explore properties of the three common states of matter (solid, liquid, and gas). Students use metric tools to measure the properties of matter-mass, volume, and temperature and observe that starting substances can change into new substances as a result of a chemical reaction.

Water
The Water Unit allows students to explore the properties of water, changes in water, interactions between water and other earth materials and how humans use water. Within this unit, students will also go through the engineering design process to produce a water filtration system or other engineering design product.

Earth Materials
The Earth Materials unit provides students an opportunity to investigate the properties of different rocks and minerals. Throughout this and all other modules, students will record their findings and understandings using the Science Notebooking process.

Social Studies

Grade four departs from the approach in the primary years (an approach that placed equal emphasis on each the social studies disciplines) to a more discipline-centered approach. A “lead discipline” is featured in each of grades four through eight. In grade four, the lead discipline is geography, focusing on political geography and the cultural landscape of North America. Students master the understandings that lay the geographical foundation for the interdisciplinary Minnesota, United States, and Global Studies courses to follow in the middle grades. They create and use various kinds of maps to identify the physical and human characteristics of places, examine regions in different locations and time periods and analyze patterns and trends in the United States, Mexico and Canada. They learn about tribal government and develop a better understanding of the multiple players involved in the United States government (political leaders and the public) and the economy (buyers and sellers in a market). Students practice a reasoned decision-making process to make choices—an important building block for their understanding of personal finance that will be developed in later grades.

Spanish

Students in fourth and fifth grade Spanish class will develop skills to allow them to communicate in Spanish. Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of other cultures and will develop insight into the nature of language and culture. In these beginning level Spanish classes, students will also reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the Spanish language.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally, and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Grade 5

Throughout fifth grade, our students become progressively more independent as they develop academically, socially and emotionally. In math, students continue to expand their problem solving skills and algebraic thinking. Students learn to read and comprehend increasingly complex fiction and non-fiction texts. By developing skills to critically analyze, revise and edit their writing, students continue to mature as writers. Students develop reading and writing skills in their social studies course, which focuses on concepts related to Minnesota and U.S. history. Through the completion of science investigations, students explore life, earth and physical science principles. Spanish, art, music and physical education experiences continue to be provided. Technology is integrated into the classroom to enhance learning experiences for students.

Art

Wayzata Art Education Mission Statement

The Art Curriculum is designed to give art teachers freedom to deliver the curriculum in a personalized manner, while ensuring all elementary students throughout the district learn the same information. There are 5 Units, or Learning Target Packages, all students will experience in 5th Grade, which include the following:

  • Mayan and Aztec Art: Students will learn about the traditional Mayan and Aztec art forms, and will use an ancient medium (clay, metal, stone, paper etc) to create an artwork combining the student’s personal culture with Mayan and/or Aztec culture.
  • Minnesota Native American Artist Star Wallowing Bull: 5th graders will be examining artworks by Star Wallowing Bull and connecting it to Pop Art. Students will then create an artwork inspired by the art of Star Wallowing Bull.
  • Principles Representation: After learning about the Elements of Art in 1st- 4th grade, students will apply their knowledge by creating an artwork representing the eight Principles of Design: unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale, positive/negative space.
  • 1-Point Perspective: Students will learn the difference between one and two point perspective and create a drawing suing 1-point perspective.
  • Body Proportions: Students will learn how to draw the human body using correct body proportions.

Additionally students in all grade levels will create art on a computer or iPad and will also create a three-dimensional artwork.

Process & Product

The Art Curriculum works to balance the process of creating with the final product, by focusing on the Create Process Map created by The Perpich Center for the Arts.

Art: Imagine, Plan, Explore, Make, Refine, Present, Reflect around creation

Visual Literacy

Visual Literacy, or the ability to ‘read’ an artwork, begins in first grade and is used in all levels of the Wayzata Art Curriculum. Visual Literacy includes Visual Analysis and Critique, and focuses on student’s making their own meaning by noticing, making connections, connecting feelings, analyzing, questioning, interpreting and speculating.

English Language Arts

Fifth graders read increasingly complex texts. They comprehend shades of meaning and reveal a deep understanding of text. They read for extended periods of time and discuss what they have read from multiple genres. The pieces they write reflect a more conscious use of language structures such as transition words. Fifth graders choose words more deliberately to convey the meaning they intend. They edit and proofread their writing and identify simple parts of speech, e.g. nouns, verbs, etc.

Health

Wayzata Public Schools has a comprehensive health education program to support the development of health literacy.

Each grade level addresses specific topics aligned to five units.

  • Mental, Emotional, Family & Social Health
  • Growth & Nutrition
  • Personal Health & Safety
  • Drugs and Disease Prevention
  • Community & Environmental Health

The primary resources used to address these topics in the classroom are McGraw Hill's Health & Wellness curriculum and the Second Step Program published by the Committee for Children.

Mathematics

Based on the belief that all students can learn, the experience of mathematics in Wayzata will create flexible problem solvers and critical thinkers.

We believe...

  • All students can learn.
  • Math is about thinking and reasoning, not just getting the answer.
  • Meaning and context is essential for learning mathematics.
  • Students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge.
  • It is critical for students to communicate their mathematical thinking.
  • All students can learn mathematics and contribute to the math environment.
  • All students will have access and contribute to high level mathematic discussions.
  • In teaching students to be persistent, flexible and creative problem solvers.
  • Students deserve to get feedback about their learning and progress towards mastery.
  • Students deserve a safe learning environment.

Bridges

Your child's classroom will use Bridges in Mathematics second edition, a comprehensive curriculum for grades K-5. Bridges is a rigorous program designed to address math standards in a way that's enjoyable and accessible to all learners.

How will my child learn math this year?

Our curriculum focuses on developing in students a deep understanding of math concepts, proficiency with key skills and the ability to solve new and complex problems. Learning activities tap into the intelligence and strengths all students have by presenting mathematically powerful material alive with language, pictures and movement.
During math time, students will talk about math, describe observations, explain methods and ask questions. They are encouraged to find multiple ways to solve problems and show different ways of thinking. This is a vital way to help students build more flexible and efficient ways to solve increasingly complex problems. Hands-on activities engage them in exploring, developing, testing, discussing and applying mathematical concepts.

How is the program structured?

Bridges features a combination of whole-group, small-group, and independent activities that are problem centered.
Problems and Investigations
Problems and Investigations often begin with a problem posed to the whole class. Students think and work independently or talk in pairs before sharing and comparing strategies and solutions as a whole class. The teacher monitors and guides the class discussion to make sure that students understand important mathematical concepts.
Work Places
Work Places are engaging math exploration activities that reinforce key skills. The teacher observes and interacts to address students' need for support and enrichment.
Number Corner
Number Corner is a skill-building program that revolves around the classroom calendar and give students an active role. They receive daily practice as well as steady encounters with broader mathematical concepts.
Homework
Home Connections assignments are sent home at the discretion of your child's teacher. At times, your child may bring home math games or activities for you to enjoy together, but the main role for parents is not to teach but to guide your student and take an interest in their work. You'll be receiving Unit Overviews throughout the year that explain the math concepts the class is currently focused on and suggest specific ways you may support your child.

How can families help?

Make connections to their math understanding and the world around them.
Be curious! What do you notice? What do you wonder?
Capture moments to talk/think about something mathematically.
Make predictions.
Helping with homework?
Visit the support for families page on the Math Learning Center website, where you will find:
  • Unit overviews that explain what your child will be learning
  • Tips for helping your child with homework
  • Links to more information about each grade level of Bridges
  • Links to additional resources, including books and free online games

Media

Students continue to learn about their choices in reading, viewing and listening and further their understanding of what makes literature great. Students will learn the purpose and criteria of book awards such as the Maud Hart Lovelace and Newbery Awards. Students will use the online catalog to find materials and manage their own accounts.

Students will continue to develop information literacy skills and skills that enhance the inquiry process. Students will use organizational tools in print and digital resources as they explore and evaluate these resources.

Music

Students will be taking part in a variety of activities in 5th grade music class where they will be developing their attitudes (perception) and feelings about music. These ongoing experiences will continue your child’s development of the following music skills: sing, move, create, read, perform, listen and describe music.

Singing activities are the primary focus of instruction and include songs from our American folk music tradition, as well as songs from many other cultures. Both individual and group participation contribute to students’ development as music makers. Your child will also listen to music written in many styles and from many different periods of history. Other activities in music class include learning to play percussion instruments, studying music history, performing rhythmic exercises, responding to music through movement and reading music notation. Special emphasis will be placed on introducing middle school music options.

The elementary music department is dedicated to the development and maintenance of a positive classroom environment and to providing a thorough music education program that is relevant to the needs and interests of each child. Our goal is to help students acquire the knowledge and skills that will enable them to explore, appreciate and participate in the rich musical culture outside of the classroom throughout their lives.

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from Kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility and enjoyment of of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a lifetime. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety and fitness.
  • Improved judgment - Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Science

Science content in fifth grade is reflective of the Minnesota State standards and focuses on five general concepts: Successfully navigating scientific investigations, forces and motion, Earth's surface, mineral and energy resources and ecosystems.

Students will experience this science content through two complimentary modes of instruction. Students will continue to learn science, as they did in grades K-4 with the hands-on approach of the Foss science curriculum, developed at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkeley.

The Foss units that will be used include:

  • Landforms
  • Levers and Pulleys
  • Variables

In addition, students will be introduced to an interactive text based approach. Students will be given a Pearson Interactive Science textbook, and access to digital materials, that will allow them to practice content reading in science as a supplement to the Foss curriculum. This balance of hands on and text based learning, will provide the experiences necessary for students to successfully transition to the middle level sciences.

In the spring of the fifth grade year, students will take the MCA-III state science test. This test evaluates the students proficiency in regard to Minnesota State science standards from grades 3-5. The Wayzata School district has historically performed much higher than the state averages on this test.

Social Studies

In grade five, the lead discipline is history supplemented by a strong secondary emphasis on citizenship and government. Students explore the history of North America in the period before 1800. They learn about complex societies that existed on the continent before 1500, and subsequent interactions between Indigenous peoples, Europeans and Africans during the period of colonization and settlement. They examine regional economies and learn that profit motivates entrepreneurs (such as early American fur traders). They trace the development of self-governance in the British colonies and identify major conflicts that led to the American Revolution. They analyze the debates that swirled around the creation of a new government and learn the basic principles of democracy that were set forth in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Students become immersed in historical inquiry, learning to “think like a historian.” They weigh the costs and benefits of decisions (such as the decision of some colonists to sever ties with the British) and analyze the contributions of historically significant people to the development of American political culture.

Spanish

Students in fourth and fifth grade Spanish class will develop skills to allow them to communicate in Spanish. Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of other cultures and will develop insight into the nature of language and culture. In these beginning level Spanish classes, students will also reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the Spanish language.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Middle School Curriculum Overview

The mission of Wayzata Public Schools is to prepare all students for the future by providing a challenging education that builds academic competence, develops responsible citizenship, encourages creativity, promotes lifelong learning, advances critical thinking skills, instills a commitment to personal wellness and fosters respect for self and others.

The middle school model reflects the attributes identified as essential for successful schools for young adolescents. Wayzata middle schools are challenging, empowering, equitable and developmentally responsive. Wayzata middle schools students continue to develop their skills and knowledge in the core areas of English Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, Science and Health. Differentiated instruction and accelerated offerings allow students' needs to be met at individualized levels. In addition to the core classes, students have a wide variety of educational experiences in the encore classes of Art; Engineering, Technology and Design; Family and Consumer Science; Spanish; Physical Education; and Music.

Grade 6

The middle school experience fosters students' academic, social and emotional development. Students are assigned to teams and receive instruction in the core areas of mathematics, language arts, social studies and science within their teams. Differentiated instruction and accelerated offerings allow students' needs to be met at individualized levels.

Sixth grade students are provided a variety of learning opportunities with an experiential focus. Two periods each day are dedicated to encore classes. Encore classes include Art; Engineering, Technology and Design; Physical Education; Spanish and a music offering. Students choose between band, orchestra and vocal music.

Art

Art Mission Statement

The 6th Grade Art Curriculum has six Units focused on further developing the foundations from their elementary art experience and preparing them to be successful in high school art courses.

  • Color Theory: Students will study Josef Albers and the Bauhaus art movement. Students will then apply their knowledge of the color wheel by creating their own using only the primary colors, black and white. The colors wheel will include tints, shades and tones.
  • Clay: Students will study artwork done by Minnesota Native American artist Ernest Whiteman and then create a clay sculpture utilizing clay building techniques.
  • 2-Point Perspective: 6th Graders were introduced to 1-point perspective in 5th grade and will now create an artwork using 2-point perspective. They will examine artwork by M.C. Escher.
  • Graphic Art: Students will study artwork from the Pop Art movement and then create an artwork using the computer or iPad, with some Pop Art aspects, using layers and manipulating the digital tools.
  • Facial & Body Proportions: Students will learn how to draw using correct body proportions, capitalizing on the introduction they had in 5th grade.

Process & Product

The Art Curriculum works to balance the process of creating with the final product, by focusing on the Create Process Map created by The Perpich Center for the Arts.

Visual Literacy

Visual Literacy, or the ability to ‘read’ an artwork, begins in first grade and is used in all levels of the Wayzata Art Curriculum. Visual Literacy includes Visual Analysis and Critique, and focuses on student’s making their own meaning by noticing, making connections, connecting feelings, analyzing, questioning, interpreting and speculating.

Engineering, Technology & Design (Tech Ed.)

Students will learn how to safely use many machines in the wood lab to make a small project. In an engineering unit the students will use NXT Mindstorm Robotics and software to build and program a robot. Two weeks of time will be keyboarding instruction. A final project will be to create an e-portfolio of all of their work this quarter.

Science

The sixth grade curriculum focuses on the physical sciences, including the study of topics related to physics and chemistry, specifically properties of matter, physical and chemical changes of matter, forces, motion, energy and energy transfer. As a part of this course, students will also have an opportunity to apply their knowledge regarding physics concepts to one or more engineering design projects. An introduction to seventh grade environmental science standards is included in the curriculum as a part of the grade level field trip to an environmental learning center.

English Language Arts

Our English Language Arts Curriculum in sixth grade uses thematic units to meet and exceed the expectations of the Minnesota State English Language Arts Standards. Students are supported in developing critical thinking skills through careful reading, textual analysis, discussion and writing activities. The course includes both literature and content-rich informational texts. The texts and themes are found in the 2015 Collections series by Houghton-Mifflin/Harcourt Publishing.

The themes include:

  1. "Facing Fear" – Through stories, poetry and scientific articles, students explore how people experience fear and how fear affects the brain and the body.
  2. "Dealing with Disaster" – From reading about Hurricane Katrina to the sinking of the Titanic, students discover how people react in the face of disaster. This unit includes articles, short stories and poems related to disasters.
  3. "Making Your Voice Heard" – Students explore the many ways people express their ideas – and themselves. They read short stories, poetry and editorials.

In addition, sixth graders read the novel Tangerine. They may read additional novels in literature groups.

Students are taught how to write a personal narrative and a literary essay plus they do research-based informational writing using the Units of Study: Writing, by Heinemann Publishing (2014). These three major writing projects plus smaller pieces of writings fulfill the Minnesota State ELA Standards for writing narratives, arguments and informational texts. Grammar and usage instruction is embedded during writing instruction. In addition, students study Greek and Latin roots to increase their vocabulary.

Mathematics

Core Connections Program Description

The math program that serves as the foundation for the middle school math experience is Core Connections, published by College Preparatory Mathematics.

CPM (College Preparatory Mathematics) teaching strategies focus on how students best learn and retain mathematics. Teaching strategies rely on the recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and are based solidly on the methodological research in teaching mathematics. The research-based principles that guide the course are:

  • Students should engage in problem-based lessons structured around a core idea.
  • Guided by a knowledgeable teacher, students should interact in groups to foster mathematical discourse.
  • Practice with concepts and procedures should be spaced over time; that is, mastery comes over time.

Resource Link for Parent Guide

Parent Guide by Chapter

  • Chapter 1: Introduction and Representation
  • Chapter 2: Arithmetic Strategies and Area
  • Chapter 3: Portions and Integers
  • Chapter 4: Variables and Ratios
  • Chapter 5: Multiplying Fractions and Area
  • Chapter 6: Dividing and Building Expressions
  • Chapter 7: Rates and Operations
  • Chapter 8: Statistics and Multiplication Equations
  • Chapter 9: Volume and Percents

Music

Sixth grade students participate in a music experience, choosing between band, orchestra and vocal music.

Band:

Band students learn the basics of playing their instrument, music reading, counting rhythms and will play small and large ensemble music. Students are placed in like-instrument groupings. Students practice at home and perform in two concerts per year. This is a beginning band experience.

Orchestra:

Orchestra is a beginning experience. Students and their parents meet with an orchestra teacher to determine proper instrument selection. Students will be introduced to the necessary skills for their development. Students are placed in one of two groups to further develop their skills.

Vocal Music:

Vocal Music students will sing music from various styles, eras and cultures. Class time will be spent studying singing, vocal pedagogy and instruction about music notation, sight-reading, composition and music history and music analysis. Students participate in two concerts each school year.

Instrument Video Example Time Frame
Flute Elisabeth Wentland - Kuhlau Fantasy for Flute 2:40-3:24
Clarinet Candide Overture by Leonard Bernstein, Quaturo Anches Hantees 0:25-1:10
Alto Sax Carnival of Venice for Alto Saxophone and Wind Ensemble 2:13-3:35
Trumpet Hummel Concerto Mvmt. 3 - Tine Thing Helseth 1:35-2:04
Horn Fantasy for Horn by Malcolm Arnold, Steve Park 3:52
Trombone Blue Bells Of Scotland. Trombone Solo/Octet 6:00
Euphonium Anthony Caillet - Cafe 1930 1:58-2:43
Tuba Oystein Baadsvik - Effie Suite 0:00-0:45
Percussion Ben Toth and Gene Koshinski- Marimba Spiritual II 7:15-7:45

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from Kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility and enjoyment of of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a lifetime. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety and fitness.
  • Improved judgment - Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others, and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Social Studies

In the middle grades, the "lead discipline" approach continues, but with added emphasis on interdisciplinary connections (as the word "Studies" in the title"Minnesota Studies" suggests). Grade six features history as the lead discipline but the focus includes geographic, economic and civic understandings. Students study Minnesota history and its government, placing the state and its people within the context of the national story. They engage in historical inquiry and study events, issues and individuals significant to Minnesota history, beginning with the early indigenous people of the upper Mississippi River region to the present day. They examine the relationship between levels of government and how the concept of sovereignty affects the exercise of treaty rights. They analyze how the state’s physical features and location of resources affected settlement patterns and the growth of cities. Drawing on their knowledge of economics, students analyze the influence of a market-based economy at the local and national levels. They learn about the unique role Minnesota played and continues to play, in regional, national and global politics.

Spanish

Students in Spanish class will develop skills to allow them to communicate in Spanish. Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of other cultures, and will develop insight into the nature of language and culture. In this beginning level Spanish class, students will also reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the Spanish language.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Grade 7

The middle school experience fosters students' academic, social and emotional development. Students are assigned to teams and receive instruction in the core areas of mathematics, language arts, social studies and science within their teams. Differentiated instruction and accelerated offerings allow students' needs to be met at individualized levels.

Seventh grade students are provided a variety of learning opportunities with an experiential focus. Two periods each day are dedicated to encore classes. Encore classes include Engineering, Technology and Design; Family and Consumer Science; Physical Education; Spanish and a music offering. Students choose between band, orchestra and vocal music.

Engineering, Technology & Design (Tech Ed.)

Seventh grade Engineering, Technology and Design students will design a CO2 Dragster using Pro Engineer software. Once the design is finished, students will use their full size pattern to make their final dragster. A race will be held toward the end of the quarter to see how fast the design is. A CNC mill will demonstrate to you how something like this could be made in industry. We will also continue with keyboarding practice with a Business Letter.

English Language Arts

Our English Language Arts Curriculum in 7th grade uses thematic units to meet and exceed the expectations of the Minnesota State English Language Arts Standards. Students are supported in developing critical thinking skills through careful reading, textual analysis, discussion and writing activities. The course includes both literature and content-rich nonfiction and informational texts. The texts and themes are found in the 2015 Collections series by Houghton-Mifflin/Harcourt Publishing.

The themes include:

  1. "Bold Actions." Students read stories and articles in which the characters face challenges. This unit includes short stories, articles and Greek myths.
  2. "Perception and Reality." Students explore how things in life are not always how we perceive them to be. In this unit they read a folk tale, poems, a drama and a science article.
  3. "Guided by a Cause." Students explore the question, "What inspires people to take action to improve their world?" They read historical writings; both literature and nonfiction.

In addition, 7th graders read the novel The Outsiders plus additional novels in literature groups.

Students are taught how to write a realistic fiction story, a research-based argument and literature analyses with the Units of Study: Writing, a curriculum published by Heinemann Publishing in 2014. These three major writing projects plus smaller pieces of writings fulfill the Minnesota State ELA Standards for writing narratives, arguments and informational texts. Grammar and usage instruction is embedded during writing instruction. In addition, students study Greek and Latin roots to increase their vocabulary.

Family and Consumer Science

In this Family and Consumer Science course, students investigate concepts related to Careers; Consumerism; and Nutrition, Wellness and Food Preparation. Through a variety of learning experiences, students develop decision-making skills and technical reading and math skills. Students learn about personal money management, time management, goal setting and the importance of being an informed consumer. Students investigate career decisions. Students learn to prepare and plan nutritious foods, maintain a clean and safe food preparation environment and analyze the effects of food on the body.

Mathematics

Core Connections Program Description

The math program that serves as the foundation for the middle school math experience is Core Connections, published by College Preparatory Mathematics.

CPM (College Preparatory Mathematics) teaching strategies focus on how students best learn and retain mathematics. Teaching strategies rely on the recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and are based solidly on the methodological research in teaching mathematics. The research-based principles that guide the course are:

  • Students should engage in problem-based lessons structured around a core idea.
  • Guided by a knowledgeable teacher, students should interact in groups to foster mathematical discourse.
  • Practice with concepts and procedures should be spaced over time; that is, mastery comes over time.

Resource Link for Parent Guide

Parent Guide by Chapter

  • Chapter 1: Introduction and Probability
  • Chapter 2: Fractions and Integer Addition
  • Chapter 3: Arithmetic Properties
  • Chapter 4: Proportions and Expressions
  • Chapter 5: Probability and Solving Word Problems
  • Chapter 6: Solving Inequalities and Equations
  • Chapter 7: Proportions and Percents
  • Chapter 8: Statistics and Angle Relationships
  • Chapter 9: Circles and Volume

Music

7th grade students participate in a music experience, choosing between band, orchestra and vocal music.

Band
7th grade band is a continuation of 6th grade band. Musical styles such as rock, jazz and traditional concert band will be explored. Students are placed in like-instrument groupings. Students practice at home and perform in two concerts per year. Students have the opportunity to audition for jazz band and additional extra curricular ensembles.

Orchestra
7th grade Orchestra is designed as a continuation of the 6th grade Blue and Gold Orchestra experience. Through appropriate repertoire and method books, students will continue to develop previously learned skills and expand their knowledge of key signatures, finger patterns, time signatures and rhythms. Students will pursue a variety of styles in both their solo and ensemble repertoire. Students participate in two concerts and a solo/ensemble festival.

Vocal Music
Vocal Music students will sing music from various styles, eras and cultures. Class time will be spent studying singing, vocal pedagogy and instruction about music notation, sight-reading, composition and music history and music analysis. Students participate in two concerts each school year. Extra Curricular Honor Choirs are available through an audition process during the middle school experience.

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from Kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility and enjoyment of of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a lifetime. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety, and fitness.
  • Improved judgment - Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Science

Seventh grade science is an introduction to the subject of biology. Units of study include:

  • basic chemistry
  • cells
  • human biology
  • genetics
  • evolution
  • diversity of life
  • ecology

This course also exposes students to the Nature of Science and Engineering while studying living organisms and the relationship between them and the environment.

Social Studies

Seventh grade features history as the lead discipline with a strong secondary emphasis on citizenship and government. The interdisciplinary "studies" approach is further enhanced with important economics and geography content that round out the study of United States history. Students learn about people, issues and events of significance to this nation’s history from 1800 to the current era of globalization. They examine the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and Supreme Court decisions for their lasting impact on the American people, economy and governance structure. Students study civics and economic principles in depth, drawing connections between these disciplines and history to explain the impact of various policies on how people lived, worked and functioned in society. They create and use detailed maps of places in the United States and conduct historical inquiry on a topic in the nation’s history.

Spanish

Students in Spanish class will develop skills to allow them to communicate in Spanish. Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of other cultures and will develop insight into the nature of language and culture. In this beginning level Spanish class, students will also reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the Spanish language.

Technology Integration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

Grade 8

The middle school experience fosters students' academic, social and emotional development. Students are assigned to teams and receive instruction in the core areas of mathematics, language arts, social studies and science within their teams. Differentiated instruction and accelerated offerings allow students' needs to be met at individualized levels. Challenging and rigorous middle school learning experiences prepare students for full participation in the numerous advanced courses offered at Wayzata High School.

Eighth grade students are provided a variety of learning opportunities with an experiential focus. Students elect from Encore classes include Engineering, Technology and Design; Family and Consumer Science; Physical Education; Spanish and a music offering. Students choose between band, orchestra and vocal music.

Art

Art Mission Statement

Students can elect to enroll in 8th Grade art, where they will explore the theme of Identity. This theme will weave its way into all of the five Units during this semester course.

  • Clay: Students will create a clay sculpture utilizing clay slab building techniques.
  • Self Portraits: Students will study artwork done by Chuck Close and will create a self portrait using correct facial proportions.
  • Graphic Art: Students will create an artwork using the computer or iPad, using layers and learning how to manipulate the digital tools.
  • Mixed Media: Students will study artwork by Minnesota Native American artist Star Wallowing Bull and will create a mixed media artwork inspired by his artworks.
  • Cast Jewelry: Students will have the opportunity to create a cast piece of jewelry, using casting techniques.

Process & Product

The Art Curriculum works to balance the process of creating with the final product, by focusing on the Create Process Map created by The Perpich Center for the Arts.

Art: Imagine, Plan, Explore, Make, Refine, Present, Reflect around creation

Visual Literacy

Visual Literacy, or the ability to ‘read’ an artwork, begins in first grade and is used in all levels of the Wayzata Art Curriculum. Visual Literacy includes Visual Analysis and Critique and focuses on student’s making their own meaning by noticing, making connections, connecting feelings, analyzing, questioning, interpreting and speculating.

Engineering, Technology & Design (Tech Ed.)

Students complete the following five units and projects in the eighth grade Engineering, Technology and Design course:

Robotics Engineering
Lego Mindstorm software will be used in a team setting for this unit. The team will construct robots and program them to complete a series of tasks using multiple sensors and communicate through Bluetooth technology.

Wood Technology
An individual end table project is used to teach how to safely operate all the machines in the wood lab, mathematics and measurement skills, technical reading and craftsmanship.

Video Production
Students will create a Public Service Announcement using a digital video camera and editing software.

Graphic Design
Using Publisher students will create their own business card, an invitation and a newsletter.

Eportfolio
As a culmination of the course you will create a digital portfolio.

English Language Arts

In 8th grade English Language Arts, we use several anthologies to explore themes and genres of literature to meet and exceed the expectations of the Minnesota State English Language Arts Standards. Students read closely to examine text in an effort to deepen understanding of literary elements, author's craft and theme in literature. This understanding is extended through writing in several genres such as narrative, poetry and literary analysis. Students read both literature and informational texts.

Our common units encompass literature found in both anthologies by Perfection Learning as well as the study of three common novels.

The units are:

  1. "Decisions, Decisions" in which students read stories, poems, and articles that focus on characters making difficult decisions and examine the factors related to decision making. The novel they read is Touching Spirit Bear by Ben Mikaelsen.
  2. "The Sci-Fi Factor" with the accompanying novel The Giver by Lois Lowry.
  3. "And Justice for All" in which students read literature that highlights social justice in a variety of settings and cultures.
  4. "Mysterious Circumstances" study of the mystery genre.

Communications
8th Graders also take a half-year Communications course. This course is designed to support students in their ability to communicate effectively through various modes of writing and speaking as well as to critically analyze the texts they encounter through media literacy.

Using the Units of Study: Writing published by Heinemann Publishing, students study investigative journalism and write a factual news story. Also, after researching topics in-depth, they write position papers in which they advocate for themselves and others in their community. These fulfill the Minnesota State ELA Standards for writing narrative and informational texts for 8th Grade. Additional units of study incorporate the Speaking, Viewing, Listening and Media Literacy standards. Students prepare and present a speech and design a marking campaign which includes visuals and a presentation.

Family and Consumer Science

In this elective family and consumer science course, students study teen nutrition, food preparation and regional and global cooking. Students have the opportunity to learn and practice advanced cooking techniques. Students investigate career options using a career interest survey.

Health

The 8th grade health curriculum is designed to allow students to examine and explore the benefits of choosing a healthy lifestyle. Student investigation will focus around the risk and prevention, decision making, analyzing influences and life applications through the following units.

  • Foundations of Health
  • Mental Health
  • Tobacco
  • Alcohol
  • Drugs
  • Relationships and Sexuality
  • CPR and Automated External Defibrillator

Mathematics

The math program that serves as the foundation for the middle school math experience is Core Connections, published by College Preparatory Mathematics.

CPM (College Preparatory Mathematics) teaching strategies focus on how students best learn and retain mathematics. Teaching strategies rely on the recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and are based solidly on the methodological research in teaching mathematics. The research-based principles that guide the course are:

  • Students should engage in problem-based lessons structured around a core idea.
  • Guided by a knowledgeable teacher, students should interact in groups to foster mathematical discourse.
  • Practice with concepts and procedures should be spaced over time; that is, mastery comes over time.

Resource Link for Parent Guide

Parent Guide by Chapter

  • Chapter 1: Problem Solving
  • Chapter 2: Simplifying with Variable
  • Chapter 3: Graphs and Equations
  • Chapter 4: Multiple Representations
  • Chapter 5: Systems of Equations
  • Chapter 6: Transformations and Similarity
  • Chapter 7: Slope and Association
  • Chapter 8: Exponents and Functions
  • Chapter 9: Angles and the Pythagorean Theorem
  • Chapter 10: Surface Area and Volume

Music

8th grade students participate in a music experience, choosing between band, orchestra, vocal music and music exploration.

Band
8th grade band is a continuation of 7th grade band. Musical styles such as rock, jazz and traditional concert band will be explored along with more advanced musical concepts and performance expectations. 8th grade students have full band every other day. Students practice at home and perform in two concerts per year. Students have the opportunity to audition for jazz band and additional extra curricular ensembles.

Orchestra
8th grade Orchestra is designed as a continuation of the 7th grade Orchestra experience. Through appropriate repertoire and methods students will continue to develop and refine previously learned skills and develop fluency of playing. Students will explore advanced technique such as shifting and vibrato, while continuing to study a varied repertoire of solo and ensemble music. Students participate in two concerts and a solo/ensemble festival.

Vocal Music
Vocal music students will develop their skills in the choral area and will focus on higher level performing skills. Individual and group musicianship will be developed through small and large group performances. The 8th grade choir will perform two concerts singing various styles, eras and cultures. Extra Curricular Honor Choirs are available through an audition process during the middle school experience.

Music Exploration
Music Exploration invites students to live music through writing, reading, playing and studying music. Students participate in various classroom music experiences and interact with many musical instruments. Students will experience music from many perspectives and gain a deeper understanding of what makes music a universal language. Students will perform in class as well as have opportunities to perform outside the classroom setting.

Physical Education

Physical education is an integral part of the total education of every child from Kindergarten through grade 12. Quality physical education programs are needed to increase the physical competence, health-related fitness, self-responsibility and enjoyment of of physical activity for all students so that they can be physically active for a lifetime. Physical education programs can provide these benefits only if they are well-planned and well-implemented so that they include the following:

  • Skill development - Physical education develops motor skills that allow for safe, successful and satisfying participation in physical activities.
  • Regular, healthful physical activity - Physical education provides a wide range of developmentally appropriate activities for all children and youth. It encourages young people to choose to be physically active and aware of the benefits of such a choice.
  • Improved physical fitness - Quality physical education improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, muscular endurance and body composition.
  • Support for other subject areas - Physical education reinforces knowledge learned across the curriculum and serves as a laboratory for application of content in science, math and social studies.
  • Self-discipline - Physical education facilitates development of responsibility for personal health, safety and fitness.
  • Improved judgment - Quality physical education influences moral development. Students learn to assume leadership, cooperate with others and accept responsibility for their own behavior.
  • Stress reduction - Physical activity becomes an outlet for releasing tension and anxiety and facilitates emotional stability and resilience.
  • Strengthened peer relations - Physical education is a major force in helping children and youth socialize with others successfully and provides opportunities to learn positive social skills. Especially during late childhood and adolescence, being able to participate in dances, games and sports is an important part of youth and peer cultures.
  • Improved self-confidence and self-esteem - Physical education instills a stronger sense of self-worth in young people based on their mastery of skills and concepts in physical activity. They become more confident, assertive, independent and self controlled.
  • Experiencing goal setting - Physical education gives children and youth the opportunity to set and strive for personal, achievable goals. (National Association for Sport and Physical Education)

Science

The 8th grade science curriculum focuses on the study of Earth Science, including Astronomy, Geology and Meteorology. In addition to these three main units, there are several Physical Science and Engineering concepts that will also be taught in order to fulfill the requirements of the Minnesota State Science Standards. To address the needs of the 21st Century Learner, this course is taught using a hands-on learning approach with an emphasis on lab-based activities. Technology integration will also be a focus of the course with the use of iPads, student response devices and Vernier hardware and software for data collection. Throughout the year, student achievement will be measured at all three middle schools by means of common assessments. All students will also take the state MCA-III science test in the spring of the year.

Social Studies

8th grade features geography as the lead discipline with a strong secondary emphasis on contemporary world history. Content drawn from citizenship and government, and economics, enriches the study of world regional geography, and further develops the interdisciplinary "studies" approach. The Global Studies benchmarks pertain to four themes (listed below), offering students additional opportunities for integrated learning experiences.

Students in Global Studies explore the regions of the world using geographic information from print and electronic sources. They analyze important trends in the modern world such as demographic change, shifting trade patterns and intensified cultural interactions due to globalization. Students participate in civic discussion on contemporary issues, conduct historical inquiry and study events over the last half century that have shaped the contemporary world. They analyze connections between revolutions, independence movements and social transformations and understand reasons for the creation of modern nation states. They learn that governments are based on different political philosophies and serve various purposes. By learning economic principles of trade and the factors that affect economic growth, students understand why there are different standards of living in countries around the world.

Note: The geography benchmarks in grade eight are sequenced by region. However, the Global Studies benchmarks may be arranged in any order for instruction. Benchmarks from all four strands (disciplines) can be integrated into one seamless course arranged according to region, chronology, theme or other organizing framework determined by the school district.

The following regions are addressed by the geography benchmarks:

  1. North America
  2. Europe and Russia
  3. Southwest Asia and North Africa
  4. East Asia and Southeast Asia
  5. South Asia and Central Asia
  6. Africa South of the Sahara
  7. Australia/Oceania

Each Global Studies benchmark relates to one of four themes (or a skills category):

  1. Cultural Characteristics, Technology, and Ideas
  2. Economic Development and Trade
  3. Population and Migration
  4. Human Interaction with the Environment
  5. (Skills such as civic skills, economic reasoning skills, geographic inquiry and geospatial technology skills, historical inquiry)

Spanish

Students will rely on their 6th and 7th grade Spanish skills to develop their language skills further. Students will expand their existing vocabulary by learning various new topics. They will learn all present tense verb forms and continue to learn proper sentence structure. A variety of activities will be used to promote listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Significant cultural events will be celebrated. This Spanish course is equivalent to Spanish 1 at Wayzata High School. Students who successfully complete this Level 1 Spanish course will be eligible to take Level 2 Spanish in 9th grade.

Technology Intergration

Wayzata Public Schools ensures that students will graduate with the necessary skills to be successful in careers and social interactions they will encounter in their futures.

In our work, we ensure:

  • Digital citizenship - Help students understand the rights and responsibilities of their actions when using digital tools.
  • Digital literacy - Help students learn how to most effectively and safely access information and tools online.
  • Critical thinking, Problem solving and Decision making.
  • Global Perspectives - Use technology to communicate and collaborate with people and places locally, nationally and globally.
  • Technology Skills - Provide the basic foundational skills in order for students to effectively use current technologies.
  • Personalized Education - Use technology to streamline the collection of data to determine student needs and to provide instruction based on individual student needs.

High School Curriculum Overview

Wayzata High School exists to create opportunities to build “Character and Scholarship for Life.” All of our efforts will go into supporting students as they develop knowledge, skills and confidence to become capable and global citizens.

  • The pursuit of knowledge leading to wisdom is a noble and admirable goal.
  • One must act on knowledge to enhance one’s life.
  • Those who strive for the dual goals of scholarship and character will improve not only their own lives, but also the lives of those around them.
  • Individuals with a strong commitment to these ideals will help form a stronger school, community, country and world.

Wayzata High School Course Guide

Art

Art Education Mission Statement

“Many people see artists as shamans, dreamers, outsiders and rebels. In reality, the artist is a builder, an engineer, a research analyst, a human relations expert, a project manager, a communications specialist and a salesman. The artist is all of those and more--combined with the imagination of an inventor and the courage of an explorer. Not a bad set of talents for any business challenged to innovate in a world of volatility, uncertainty and change.” —Steven Tepper, Fast Company, March 2013

Learning through the arts is essential to 21st century education through the following methods: 1) the arts are an essential language to strengthen reading and writing, as well as visual literacy; 2) the arts develop essential skills for global competitiveness; and 3) the arts promote active and complex learning through the development of critical and creative thinking skills.

Wayzata Public Schools have adopted a comprehensive curriculum in visual arts in which students have experiences in making art (art production), developing skills in expressing ideas about the nature of art, both orally and through writing (aesthetics), analyzing and forming judgments about art works (art criticism) and appreciating the significance of art across time in human cultures (art history).

The Art Department offers a sequential range of courses in the following disciplines: AP Art History, Digital Photography, Drawing, 3D Design, Graphic Art & Design, Painting and Pottery. Courses with Advanced or Advanced Placement offerings can be found under Art History, Drawing and Pottery.

Business, Marketing and Technology

The Wayzata Business Education department offers an unparalleled opportunity for students to receive a top quality business learning experience. We provide a rigorous, relevant curriculum that not only teaches necessary business skill, ethics and strategies, but also educates students how to build relationships that will prepare the aspiring professional to play significant roles in the competitive global economy.

Elective in School; Requirement for Life... Got Business?!
It is strongly recommended that all students complete Computer & Technology Essentials to gain a fundamental understanding of technology before graduation.

Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (C) CEP
Concurrent Enrollment is a partnership between secondary and post secondary schools. Through this partnership, qualified students can earn college credit prior to high school graduation. CEPs differ from other pre college credit programs because high school instructors teach the college courses during the normal school day. Students receive dual credit and there are not additional costs for the student. A college transcript will be mailed to the student from the post secondary institution.

Course Articulation
High school students may take technical college courses while still attending high school. These high school courses have been matched with similar courses at various community and technical colleges in the metro area. Students meeting the college requirement will earn college credit, as well as high school credit, to apply toward graduation. Articulated courses are designated with a dagger (†). More information may be obtained at Minnesota Community and Technical College Credit Program.

744 (Internship/Mentorship) or 745 (Internship) Internship Program
To be eligible for the Internship program a student must have taken or be currently enrolled in an advanced/capstone class in either the Business/Marketing/ Technology, Family and Consumer Science, or Engineering/Technology/Design department(s). These courses may be taken before or during the first term while enrolled in the Internship program.

Engineering, Technology and Design

The Engineering, Technology and Design Department fosters student learning that will develop 21st century competencies in a constantly changing technological environment. Engineering, technology and design prepares students to be technologically literate global citizens and contributing members of an evolving society. The application, evaluation and synthesis of math, science and engineering concepts are integral components of instruction necessary to develop 21st century technological competencies. The Engineering, Technology and Design Department provides students with the opportunity to enroll in a variety of courses that will prepare them for a successful future.

Course Articulation (†)
High school students may take technical college courses while still attending high school. These high school courses have been matched with similar courses at Hennepin Technical College, Anoka Technical College, Normandale Community College, St. Cloud Technical & Community College, St. Cloud State University and Anoka-Ramsey Community College. Students meeting the technical college requirements will earn technical college credit, as well as high school credit, to apply toward graduation. This is an excellent way to get a head start on an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree without leaving the high school. Articulated courses are designated with a dagger (†).

English

Students at Wayzata High School earn English credits by choosing literature, writing, speech and/or general English courses. All courses include a variety of language arts activities; for instance, a literature course may include writing, vocabulary and/or speech work. Be aware that certain college may not accept some courses for English credit. Courses with an asterisk (*) indicate they may not meet individual entrance requirements for some colleges. The State of Minnesota requires that students take one "A" course and one "B" course during their junior and senior year to fulfill State Standards.

Family and Consumer Science

Through experiential learning, Family and Consumer Sciences prepares individuals to live and work in a global society. Our unique focus is on healthy lifestyles, families, careers and their interrelationships.

Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (C) CEP
Concurrent Enrollment is a partnership between secondary and post secondary schools. Through this partnership, qualified students can earn college credit prior to high school graduation. CEPs differ from other pre college credit programs because high school instructors teach the college courses during the normal school day. Students receive dual credit and there are not additional costs for the student. A college transcript will be mailed to the student from the post secondary institution.

Course Articulation (†)
High school students may take technical college courses while still attending high school. These high school courses have been matched with similar courses at Hennepin Technical College. Students meeting the technical college requirements will earn technical college credit, as well as high school credit, to apply toward graduation. This is an excellent way to get a head start on an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree without leaving the high school. Articulated courses are designated with a dagger (†).

Mathematics

Students are urged to carefully select mathematics courses to meet the requirements of Wayzata Public Schools, state requirements and to best prepare them for their post secondary plans. Wayzata Public Schools requires students to take eight credits in mathematics. More and more universities and occupations require a study of mathematics that includes an understanding of concepts from algebra, geometry, probability, statistics and discrete mathematics. As a minimum, students should consider taking mathematics courses at least through Integrated Math ematics 3/Algebra 2. In most cases, universities may want applicants to have completed mathematics courses through Integrated Mathematics 4/Precalculus. Additionally, taking mathematics courses during your senior year is very important in providing a smooth transition from high school to college and university study. Incoming 9th grade students may register for 301 (Intermediate Algebra) or 302 (Accelerated Intermediate Algebra) and 304 (Geometry) or 305 (Accelerated Geometry) based upon the recommendation of their 8th grade math teacher. If students and their parents opt to disregard teachers' recommendations, they must fill out the appropriate form and return it with their registration materials.

Algebra: Resource Link for Parent Guide

Algebra 2: Resource Link for Parent Guide

Geometry: Resource Link for Parent Guide

Science

Course offerings are designed to appeal to a wide range of interests and skills. All courses involve laboratory work. Some courses require advance reading and math skills; these usually have a challenge level similar to freshman college courses.

Wayzata Public Schools requires students to take eight credits in science.

In order for students to select courses that match ability, interest level and reading level, descriptions should be real carefully. Interest level and reading skill are considered in all courses. Math skill is considered more important as students move from biology to chemistry to physics.

Performing Arts

The Performing Arts Department offers classes in three areas:

  1. Performing Music Ensembles
  2. General Music
  3. Theatre

All courses in the Performing Arts Department meet the Fine Arts requirements for graduation.

Performing Music Ensembles
Performing Music Ensembles include band, choir and orchestra. Because of their performance requirements, time will be required outside of the normal school day, usually several evenings per year. Students participating in band, choir, or orchestra are also eligible for a wide range of co-curricular groups including Chamber Singers, Jazz Ensembles, Madrigals, Symphony Orchestra, Percussion Ensembles, Spirit Band, Pit Orchestra, Vive Voce, etc. Detailed information on these groups will be presented in class.

Band
The band program at Wayzata High School offers opportunities in all aspects of a well-rounded band curriculum including Concert Band, Marching Band, Symphonic Band, Wind Symphony, Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensembles, Spirit Band, Musical Pit Orchestra and Percussion Ensemble. All band students will perform at three or more concerts throughout the school year. Some band members will also play at the Lake Conference Band Festival. All band students participate in the Solo/Ensemble contest. The Marching Band (grades 10-12 only) performs at all home football games and several community parades. The Wind Ensemble tours periodically and the Marching Band occasionally takes a major trip.

Registration:
• All current 8th grade band students sign up for 650 Concert Band.
• All current 9th grade band students sign up for 651 Marching Band and 652 Band Grades 10-12.
• All current 10-11th grade band students sign up for 651 Marching Band and/or 652 Band Grades 10-12.

After playing evaluations in February, current 9-11th grade band students will be placed in a specific band. The band directors will work with the Scheduling Office to facilitate these placements.

Choir
The Wayzata High School Choir Program offers a broad range of opportunities for students who are interested in building classical vocal technique. Students who register for the Wayzata High School choral program can expect to study music from traditional choral repertoire. Emphasis will be placed upon disciplined ensemble behaviors and rehearsal etiquette. Students will be tested on sight reading skills and part preparation individually throughout the year. There are six curricular choirs: Bel Canto (11-12), Cantori (10), Concert (11-12), Cantabile (9), Troubadours (9) and Varsity (10-12). For students who are members of choirs in grades 10-12, there are three co-curricular opportunities: Madrigals, Vive Voce and Chamber Singers. 10-12th choir students perform in at least three concerts throughout the year. 9th grade choir students perform in two concerts. In the spring, 9th grade students are featured in a concert of their own, while 10-12th grade students perform in “Moment in Time,” a choral revue of Broadway, Pop and Jazz music. 10-12th grade students also participate in Classical Lake Conference Festivals and Minnesota State High School League Large Group contests. Members of WHS Choirs have the opportunity to participate in several MSHSL Solo/Ensemble contests in the spring.

Registration:
  • All 9th grade tenor and bass students should sign up for Troubadours.
  • All 9th grade female choir students should sign up for Cantabile.
  • All 10th grade treble voice students should sign up for Cantori.
  • All 10th grade tenor and bass students should sign up for Varsity Choir.
  • All 11th and 12th grade choir students should sign up for Bel Canto or Varsity Choirs. Adjustments will be made in the scheduling office for 11th and 12th grade students who choose to audition for Concert Choir in the spring.

Orchestra
The Wayzata High School Orchestra Program offers exceptional opportunities for students across a wide range of abilities, from those who have primarily received instruction through the Wayzata middle school orchestra program to those who have studied privately for many years. Curricular goals of increased confidence in instrumental technique, increased understanding of musical expression and increased awareness of ensemble skills are met through the study of traditional and contemporary repertoire and pedagogical materials. Students will be engaged by the process of building on past skills and experiences, excited by the opportunity to share time and talents with like-minded peers and enriched by the experience of performing varied music in varied settings. All string classes and orchestras meet every other day for the full year. Classes on the opposite day are traditionally Physical Education (9), English (10), Chemistry (11) and Economic/Public Policy (12), but these are not guaranteed. Options such as weight training, the Cantori, Bel Canto and Concert choirs, Modern American Literature, Wind Ensemble, Honors English 10 and U.S. History may also be available to some students.

All string classes and orchestras perform at least three times each year. Depending on their placement, students may be able to access additional competitive and non-competitive large group, small ensemble and solo experiences such as the All-State Orchestra, the Minnesota State High School League contest, the Middle Level Orchestra Festival, Pit Orchestra and opportunities for local, regional and national travel/performance.

Registration:
All Students planning to play in an orchestra should register for 671 Orchestra. Students will be placed in the appropriate orchestra (Intermezzo, String, Camerata, Sinfonia or Chamber) following auditions in March. The director and the Scheduling Office will handle all required schedule changes.

General Music
General Music course offerings include Music Production, Music History and Music Theory. Course lengths and requirements are detailed on the following pages.

Theatre
Theatre course offerings include
Theatre 1: Introduction to Acting
Theatre 2: Acting Styles
Theatre 3: Directing Workshop, and Improvisation and Comedy Studies

Social Studies

As advocates for social studies, we believe that a strong social science curriculum is a fundamental component of a vibrant democratic society. The Wayzata High School Social Studies department is dedicated to providing students with a high quality, engaging program of study that will promote civic efficacy, increase cultural proficiency and lead to personal and professional success in a fast-paced, dynamic and inter-dependent global society. In this model, the student is an active participant, fully engaged in acquiring meaningful content knowledge, accessing and analyzing information and applying social studies themes and concepts to more deeply understand contemporary global challenges and events.

At each grade level students are directed to a core social science curriculum that has been designed to challenge their intellect and support their social and emotional development. Those students who are particularly interested in the social sciences can select from an extensive list of enriched or advanced placement offerings. In addition, there are a variety of social studies electives available to students in grades 10 through 12. The elective course offerings allow students to enhance their liberal arts education in ways that suit individual tastes, preferences and requirements for life beyond high school.

Physical Education and Health

All incoming 9th grade students are required to take two terms of 9th grade physical education. One term of health is required in 10th grade or later.

World Language

Factors students should consider when registering for World Languages:

  • All courses beyond level 1 have a prerequisite. In order to have adequate background to complete the next level successfully, it is recommended that a student demonstrate evidence of sustained performance at a “B” or better in both terms of the prerequisite course.
  • All students are encouraged to continue as far as possible in the course sequence. Longer study time leads to increased language proficiency, greater personal satisfaction and more success at college level language study. We encourage all students to learn at least one language other than English.
  • Most colleges and universities recommend 2-3 years of a single world language for admission.
  • Students in grades 9-12 may take two levels of the same language in one school year.
  • Students in grades 9-12 may study more than one language.
  • Students completing level 4 or AP language courses have the opportunity to take the Minnesota Language Proficiency Assessment, the placement test currently used by the University of Minnesota. Students may receive up to 10 credits at the University of Minnesota depending on their score.
  • Students completing Advanced Placement may sign up for the Advanced Placement Exam given in May. Students may earn university-level credit depending on their score and individual university policy. See any language teacher for further information.
  • The HSK (Chinese: 汉语水平考试)--the Chinese Proficiency Test/Chinese Standard Exam, is China's only standardized test of Standard Chinese language proficiency for non-native speakers such as foreign students and overseas Chinese. It is not uncommon to refer to a standard or level of proficiency by the HSK level number, or score. For example, a job description might ask for foreign applicants with "HSK5 or better." The test is administered by Hanban, an agency of the Ministry of Education of the People's Republic of China.
  • The AAPPL exam awards Bilingual and Multilingual seals and a World Language Proficiency Certificate. The AAPPL Measure is available in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and ESL. New languages are in development. Contact a language instructor for further information. Minnesota State Colleges and Universities award college credit to students who receive the AAPPL awards in grades 10, 11 and 12. The University of Minnesota is not part of the MN STATE Colleges and Universities system.
  • Students completing level 4 or AP language courses have the opportunity to take the Minnesota Language Proficiency Assessment, the placement test currently used by the University of Minnesota. Students may receive up to 10 credits at the University of Minnesota depending on their score.
  • Students completing Advanced Placement may sign up for the Advanced Placement Exam given in May. Students may earn university level credit depending on their score and individual university policy. See any language teacher for further information.

Curriculum Review Cycle

Curriculum Review Process

K-3 Literacy Plan

Brigid Austin
Social Studies, English Language Arts
763-745-5026
Brigid.Austin@wayzataschools.org

Tina Christopherson
Technology Integration
763-745-6652
Tina.Christopherson@wayzataschools.org

Ann Fehrenbach
English Language Arts, English Language Learners, Title I
763-745-6027
Ann.Fehrenbach@wayzataschools.org

Courtney LaRoche
Mathematics
763-745-6028
Courtney.LaRoche@wayzataschools.org

Carrie Lunetta
Professional Development
763-745-6035
Carrie.Lunetta@wayzataschools.org

Amanda Padjen
Data Integration/Illuminate
763-745-6077
Amanda.Padjen@wayzataschools.org

Michelle Reinke
Science
763-745-6022
Michelle.Reinke@wayzataschools.org

Julie Schneider
Teacher Leader for Reading Intervention
763-745-5516
Julie.Schneider@wayzataschools.org

Belinda Stutzman
Technology Integration
763-745-5166
Belinda.Stutzman@wayzataschools.org

Scott Tordeur
Business & Technology Education
763-745-6920
Scott.Tordeur@wayzataschools.org

Dave Zukor
Technology Integration
763-745-5108
Dave.Zukor@wayzataschools.org

Marie Beck
Science Center Secretary
763-745-6137
Marie.Beck@wayzataschools.org

Joni Larson
Reading Office Secretary
763-745-6119
Joni.Larson@wayzataschools.org

Lauri Peterson
Teaching & Learning Secretary
763-745-5021
Lauri.Peterson@wayzataschools.org